What does dominic mean in other languages

Registered since: 07/29/2013 7:46 PM
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29.07.2013, 20:00:47
Hello,

I registered in this forum today because I have a question that I couldn't find an answer to.

Is there an umbrella term for words that have the same spelling but different meanings in different languages.

Example:
Kurt in Turkish = wolf and in German it's a = name
Cocktail in English = alcoholic mixed drink and in German = cocktails
etc etc.

So I'm looking for the umbrella term for such words!

And I'm looking, which is of course the reason for the search for the umbrella term, words that meet this condition, if they are funny then all the better!

I'm also looking for a professional who speaks Chinese, so I have a few questions.

I'm hoping for an answer to my question here, but I'll be honest, most of the forum posts sound like Chinese to me.

lg Daniel
29.07.2013, 20:11:34
Hello, @Vortarulo would be the right person for both. he once put together a whole list of such examples, where the meanings are similar. Words that just sound the same can be called "homonyms", although this would rarely be done across language barriers.

If you are on Facebook: there is a group called "Linguistic Coincidences" that list exactly such pseudo-cognates, words that are not historically related, but sound similar and have a similar meaning: https://www.facebook.com / groups / 219696361381423 /


Incidentally, there is no coincidence involved in the cocktail. Ultimately, it goes back to the name for a mixed drink that was named after the cropped and / or high-tied tail of non-thoroughbred horses (which was called 'cocktail'), precisely because of the mixture.
29.07.2013, 20:19:19
(07/29/2013, 20:00:47) gauxin wrote: Is there an umbrella term for words that have the same spelling but different meanings in different languages.

Hello,
Such words are commonly called false friends or "false friends" in German. A classic example here is the English gift, which does not mean "poison". There are hundreds of thousands of them, oh what am I saying, millions, so that a collection is not really worth it.

What I have collected, however, are, as Janwo already said, coincidentally identical words that even mean the same thing, although they are not related to each other, so-called pseudo-cognates. In Persian, "bad" means bad, for example, just like in English. Even the pronunciation is practically identical (both [bæd]), but the words are not related. It's really just a coincidence.
I once collected such a list and published it on my blog: Pseudo-Cognates (sometimes I also add new ones).

And on the subject of Chinese: I studied Sinology, spent a year in China and speak the language (not very fluent anymore, but still quite good). I am glad to help. So go ahead. :)

Greeting,
- André
Registered since: 07/29/2013 7:46 PM
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30.07.2013, 19:08:37
(07/29/2013, 20:19:19) Vortarulo wrote:
(07/29/2013, 20:00:47) gauxin wrote: Is there an umbrella term for words that have the same spelling but different meanings in different languages.

Hello,
Such words are commonly called false friends or "false friends" in German. A classic example here is the English gift, which does not mean "poison". There are hundreds of thousands of them, oh what am I saying, millions, so that a collection is not really worth it.

What I have collected, however, are, as Janwo already said, coincidentally identical words that even mean the same thing, although they are not related to each other, so-called pseudo-cognates. In Persian, "bad" means bad, for example, just like in English. Even the pronunciation is practically identical (both [bæd]), but the words are not related. It's really just a coincidence.
I once collected such a list and published it on my blog: Pseudo-Cognates (sometimes I also add new ones).

And on the subject of Chinese: I studied Sinology, spent a year in China and speak the language (not very fluent anymore, but still quite good). I am glad to help. So go ahead. :)

Greeting,
- André

Hello Andre,

First of all, many thanks for the quick reply.

So that with poison is great, heard a thousand times but it didn't occur to me - thank you!

I'm only looking for words like poison, which are identical in spelling but different in meaning.

About the Chinese, I once had an experience in China, my translator had at a business lunch that the first word in German that he could remember was mouse. The reason was that in Chinese Mao = cat and s = food or food, or food whatever means, so like cat food! Quasi a donkey bridge, or real Mao s! I would like to know.
I'm also looking for a Chinese word that is spelled similarly, that is, written in Pinyin.

Generally I look for such words from different languages.

Greetings daniel
Registered since: 07/29/2013 7:46 PM
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15.08.2013, 12:31:51
Hello everybody,

does anyone still have an idea about such words, no matter what language.

Daniel
Registered since: 07/29/2013 7:46 PM
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17.08.2013, 16:10:04
@janwo,

Thank you very much!

I'm looking for exactly such words when you have more of them, I'm really looking forward to them.

Daniel
Registered since: 07/18/2013 5:26 PM
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08/18/2013, 21:31:44 (This post was last edited: 08/18/2013, 21:47:34 by thf.)
A few examples come to mind for Finnish (but there are certainly more):
fin. yes, "and" vs. German yes
fin. musta, "black" vs. German pattern ([ˈmʊstʰɐ])
fin. en, (1st Sg. of the negative verb) vs. isl. en "but" (and, comparison and others; all in all a bit difficult to translate. There are also enn, as well as comparable forms in the other Scandinavian languages).

Forms like Danish gammel "old" vs. German Gammel would certainly be borderline cases, because a clear relationship can be established.

Another note: The English Wiktionary is organized according to orthographic forms. This means that if you search for a sequence of letters such as on, you get an overview of forms that correspond to this (in Latin (trans) script); In any case, you have to take into account that it is an orthographic representation that sometimes only allows loose conclusions about the phonetic form and, conversely, forms that are similar in sound may not be listed together because their spelling is different.
Registered since: 07/18/2013 5:26 PM
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Affiliation: UOC Barcelona
24.08.2013, 18:00:03
(23.08.2013, 22:23:12) kpl wrote: here is an example from Switzerland:

Handy = detergent
Natel = mobile phone

Mobile phone (German): mobile phone
mobile phone (English): practical (mobile phone is AE cell phone and BE mobile)

one of my favorite examples is by the way:

German father vs. Catalan vàter: toilet (pronunciation, however, somewhere between w and ʋ, not v!)