How to put a baseball cap backwards

Tannhauser”By Richard Wagner libretto (English German)



Hermann - bass
Tannhauser - tenor
Wolfram von Eschenbach - baritones
Walther von der Vogelweide - tenor
Biterolf - bass
Henry the scribe - tenor
Reinmar von Zweter - bass
Elisabeth - soprano
Venus - soprano
A young shepherd - soprano
Four Pages - Soprano And Alto

Thuringian knights. Counts and noblemen. Noblewomen. Older pilgrims. Younger pilgrims. Sirens. Naiads. Nymphs. Bacchantes

Time: At the beginning of the thirteenth century

Act One: The interior of the Hörselberg near Eisenach; A valley below the Wartburg
Act Two: On the Wartburg
Act Three: Valley below the Wartburg




OVERTURE



Hermann - bass
Tannhauser - tenor
Wolfram von - baritone
Walther von der Vogelweide - tenor
Biterolf - bass
Henry the scribe - tenor
Reinmar von Zweter - bass
Elisabeth - soprano
Venus - soprano
A young shepherd - soprano
Four noble boys - soprano and alto

Thuringian knights. Counts and nobles. Noblewomen. Older and younger pilgrims. Sirens. Naiads. Nymphs. Bacchantes

Time: At the beginning of the 13th century

First elevator: the interior of the Hörselberg near Eisenach; a valley in front of the Wartburg
Second elevator: on the Wartburg
Third display: valley in front of the Wartburg




OVERTURE



SCENE ONE
The interior of the Venusberg (the Hörselberg, near Eisenach). A wide grotto which, as it curves towards the right in the background, seems to be prolonged till the eye loses it in the distance. From an opening in the rocks, through which the daylight filters dimly, a greenish waterfall plunges down the whole height of the grotto, foaming wildly over the rocks; out of the basin that receives the water a brook flows to the further background; it there forms into a lake, in which Naiads are seen bathing, while Sirens recline on its banks. - On both sides of the grotto are projecting cliffs, of irregular form, covered with wonderful, coral-like tropical growths. In front of an opening in the grotto, stretching upwards to the left, through which comes a soft roseate half-light, Venus reclines in the foreground on a rich couch; before her, his head in her lap, his harp by his side, is Tannhäuser, half-kneeling. The Three Graces, charmingly entwined, recline about the couch. At the side of and behind the couch are numerous sleeping cupids, huddled together in a confused tangle, like children who, tired after play, have fallen asleep. The whole of the foreground is illuminated from below, by a magical rosy light, through which the emerald-green of the waterfall and the white foam of its waves break in strong contrast. A clear blue vapor envelopes the far background, with the banks of the lake, in a kind of moonlight. When the curtain rises, the youths, holding goblets in their hands, are still reclining on the cliffs; now, in response to the alluring signs of the Nymphs, they hasten down to these; the Nymphs have already begun, round the foaming basin of the waterfall, the inviting dance that is meant to draw the youths to them. The two groups mix together in pairs; pursuits, flights and alluring coquetries enliven the dance. From the far background comes a swarm of Bacchantes, who break through the ranks of the amorous couples, inciting them to wilder delights. By gestures of exalted intoxication the Bacchantes urge on the lovers to further abandonment. The revellers embrace each other with the most ardent passion. Satyrs and Fauns emerge from the clefts in the rocks, and thrust themselves with their dance between the Bacchantes and the pairs of lovers. They increase the confusion by chasing the nymphs; the general tumult rises to the maddest climax. At the outburst of the greatest delirium, the three Graces rise to their feet, horror-stricken. They try to restrain the furious groups and drive them off. Impotent against them, they fear that they themselves will be drawn into the whirl; they turn to the sleeping Cupids flutter upwards and in different directions like a flock of birds, and, drawn up as it were in battle array on the heights, and commanding the whole cavern, they rain down a ceaseless shower of arrows on the tumult beneath . The wounded, seized by a powerful yearning for love, quit the mad dance and sink down in exhaustion; the graces take possession of the wounded, and try, by disposing the revellers in pairs, to disperse them with gentle force towards the background; there the Bacchantes, Fauns, Satyrs, Nymphs and Youths withdraw, pursued in by Cupids from the heights. A rosy mist comes down, growing thicker and thicker as it descends. In it the Cupids first disappear; Then it envelops the whole background, so that finally, beside Venus and Tannhauser, only the three graces remain visible. These now return towards the foreground; gracefully interlocked they drawn near to Venus, and apparently tell her of the victory they have won over the mad passions of the subjects of her realm. Venus gives them a grateful glance. (The thick mist in the background dissolves, revealing a cloud-picture of the Rape of Europa; she is being carried across the blue sea on the back of the garlanded white bull, escorted by Tritons and Nereids)



FIRST SCENE
The stage represents the interior of the Venusberg (Hörselberg near Eisenach). A wide grotto, which in the background extends through a bend to the right as if unpredictable. From a jagged opening through which dull daylight shines, a greenish waterfall cascades down the whole height of the grotto, foaming wildly over the rock; from the basin which catches the water, the brook flows towards the far background, which there gathers to a lake in which one can see the figures of bathing naiads and sirens encamped on its banks. On both sides of the grotto rocky outcrops of irregular shape guarded by wonderful, coral-like, tropical plants. In front of a grotto opening that extends upwards to the left, from which a delicate pink twilight shines out, Venus lies in the foreground on a rich bed, in front of her, her head in her lap, the harp to one side, Tannhauser, half kneeling. Surrounding the camp, encircled in a lovely entanglement, are the three Graces. To the side and behind the camp numerous sleeping cupids, lying wildly above and next to each other, forming a tangled tangle, like children who have fallen asleep, exhausted from a scuffle. The whole foreground is illuminated by a magical, reddish light shining through from underneath, through which the emerald green of the waterfall, with the white of its foaming waves, breaks through strongly. The distant background with the shores of the lake is illuminated like a moonlight by a transfigured blue scent. - When the curtain is being raised, the youths are still lying on the raised projections near the cups, who now immediately follow the tempting waves of the nymphs and hurry down to them; The nymphs had begun the inviting dance around the foaming basin of the waterfall, which was to lead the young men to them: the couples find and mix; Searching, fleeing and delightful teasing enliven the dance. From the far background a procession of Bacchantes approaches, which rushes through the rows of loving couples, inviting wild pleasure. With gestures of enthusiastic drunkenness, the Bacchantes incite the lovers to increasing exuberance. The intoxicated throw themselves into ardent love hugs. Satyrs and fauns have emerged from the rifts and are now pushing their dance between the bacchants and loving couples. They add to the confusion by hunting the nymphs; the general frenzy increases to the highest level of anger. Here, at the outbreak of the highest frenzy, the three Graces rise in horror. They seek to put a stop to the angry ones and remove them. Powerless, they fear being dragged along with them: they turn to the sleeping cupids, shake them up and chase them up. These flutter upwards like a flock of birds, take up the whole space of the cave, as if in battle order, and from there shoot an incessant hail of arrows at the tumult below. The wounded, seized by powerful tendons of love, let go of the frenzied dance and sink into exhaustion. The Graces seize the wounded and, by joining the drunk in pairs, seek to disperse them toward the background with gentle force. There, in the most varied of directions, the bacchants, fauns, satyrs, nymphs and youths move away, sometimes followed from the heights by the cupids. A more and more dense, rosy scent descends: in it first the cupids disappear, then it covers the whole background, so that finally, apart from Venus and Tannhauser, only the three Graces remain visible. These now turn back to the foreground; in graceful entanglements they approach Venus, telling her, as it were, of the victory she won over the wild passions of the subjects of her empire. Venus looks at them gratefully. (The dense scent in the background splits up: a fog picture shows the kidnapping of Europa, which is cruising through the blue sea on the back of the white bull adorned with flowers, led by Tritons and Nereids)

CHOIR OF SIRENS

Draw near the stand!
Approach the land,
where, in the arms
of glowing love,
let blissful warmth
content your desires!
(The rosy mist gathers again, obliterating the picture, and the Graces interpret in a graceful dance the mystic meaning of the picture as a work of love. Once more the mist dissolves. In the soft half-light of the moon, Leda is seen reclining on the banks of a woodland lake. The swan swims up to her and fawningly lays his head upon her bosom)

CHOIR OF SIRENS
Draw near the beach!
Approach the land!
This picture also gradually fades away. At last the mist wholly disappears, showing the entire grotto lonely and still. The Graces smilingly make obeisance to Venus and slowly move off the grotto of love. Deepest quiet. Venus and Tannhauser mantain their attitudes unchanged

CHOIR OF SIRENS
(invisible)
Approach the beach!
Draw near to the land
where in the arms
ardent love
blessed mercy
calm your urges!
The rosy scent closes again, the picture disappears, and the graces now suggest, through a graceful dance, the mysterious content of the picture as a work of love. The scent divides again. In the gentle twilight of the moon, you can see Leda stretched out by the forest ponds; the swan swims towards her and flatters its neck in her bosom

CHOIR OF SIRENS
Approach the beach!
Draw near to the land!
Gradually this picture is also fading. The scent finally disappears completely and shows the whole grotto lonely and quiet. The Graces bow mischievously to Venus and slowly move away to the Grotto of Love. Deepest calm. Unchanged group of Venus and Tannhausers.

SCENE TWO
(Tannhäuser lifts up his head suddenly, as if starting from a dream.- Venus draws him back again caressingly)

VENUS

Tell me, beloved, of what are you thinking?

TANNHÄUSER

Too much! Too much!



Oh, that I now might awake!

SECOND SCENE
(Tannhauser jerks his head up, as if he were starting from a dream.
(Tannhäuser puts his hand over his eyes, as if trying to capture a dream image)

VENUS
(very quiet)
Beloved, say where is your mind?

TANNHÄUSER
(fast)
Too much! Too much!

(slower and quiet)

Oh, that I woke up now!

VENUS

Tell me what ails you.

TANNHÄUSER
In dreams, it was as if I heard -
a sound long stranger to my ears -
as if I heard the joyful peal of bells!
Oh tell me! How long is it since I heard them?

VENUS

What is it holds you in thrall?
Where are you straying?




TANNHÄUSER

The time I have sojourned here
I cannot measure.
Days, moons - mean nothing to me any more,
for I no longer see the sun,
nor the friendly stars of heaven;
I see no more the blades of grass, which, turning freshly green,
bring the new summer in;
the nightingale that foretells me the spring,
I hear no more.
Shall I never hear it, never behold it more?

VENUS

Ha! What do I hear? What foolish complaining?
Are you so soon wearied of the sweet wonder
my love devises for you?
Or what? Can you so greatly regret being a god?
Have you so soon forgot how once
you suffered, whilst now you delight in pleasure here?



Come my singer




up and grasp your lyre!
Celebrate love, which you extol so marvelously in song,
that you won the goddess of love herself for yours!
Celebrate love, for its highest prize has become yours!
VENUS
(calm and flattering)
Tell me what troubles you!

TANNHÄUSER
In my dream it was as if I heard -
what has been strange to my ear for so long! -
as if I heard the joyful peal of the bells!
Oh tell me, how long have I not heard it anymore?

VENUS
(as previously)
What is touching you
Where are you losing yourself

(She guides the hand gently
over his forehead)


TANNHÄUSER
(melancholy)
The time that I stay here
I cannot measure it:
Days and moons no longer exist for me;
because I no longer see the sun
stars no longer friendly to heaven;
I no longer see the stalk, which is freshly greening
brings the new summer;
I no longer hear the nightingale
who announce the spring for me.
Do I never hear them, do I never see them again?

VENUS
(with calm amazement)
Ha! What do I hear? What foolish complaints!
Are you tired of beautiful miracles so soon,
that my love prepares for you
Or what? could you regret being a god so much?
Did you forget as soon as you once did
suffered while now you rejoice?

(She gets up)

My singer, up!
(She takes the harp
and holds it up to him)


Up and take hold of your harp;
celebrate the love that you sing so gloriously,
that you won the love goddess herself!
Celebrate love because you have received its highest price!

TANNHÄUSER
(takes up his lyre)



Let your prices ring out! Let the marvel
your might created for me, fortunate as I am, be extolled!
May the sweet delight, jump from your favor,
raise my song up in a loud cry of jubilation!
My heart yearned, oh my senses thirsted
after pleasure, after delicious gratification:
that which once you rendered to gods alone
you graciously bestowed upon me, a mortal.
But mortal, oh, I have remained
and your loving is too huge for me.
Though a god may incessantly savor enjoyment,
I am subject to change:
not pleasure alone lies close to my heart -
in the midst of joy I crave after pain.
From your kingdom I must fly -
O queen,
goddess, let me go!

VENUS

What's this I must rake to? What kind of singing is that?
Into what doleful strain has your song lapsed?
Whither has that inspiration flown,
which once prompted songs of delight alone from you?
What is it? Wherein has my love proved wanting?
Beloved, with what do you reproach me?

TANNHÄUSER
Thanks be to your favor! May your loving be extolled!
Fortunate forever the man who has tarried with you!
Forever envied he who, with ardent passion,
has shared the godlike glow in your embrace!
Entrancing are the marvels of your kingdom,
I breathe the magic of all pleasure here;
no country on the broad earth offers the like,
what they possess you can easily spare.
But amid these rosy perfumes
I long for the woodland breezes,
for the clear blue of our skies,
for the fresh green of our meadows,
for the sweet song of our little birds,
for the dear sound of our bells.
From your kingdom I must fly -
O queen,
goddess, let me go!

TANNHÄUSER
(to a sudden decision
reassured, seizes his harp and sets
solemnly before Venus)


You sound praise! the miracles be praised,
that your power made me happy!
The delights that flow from your grace are sweet,
raise my song with a loud cheer!
For joy, alas! after wonderful enjoyment
my heart demands, my mind thirsted:
because what only gods you once demonstrated,
gave your favor to me mortal.
But mortally, alas! I stayed
and your beloved is oversized for me;
if a god can always enjoy
I am subject to change;
not only pleasure is important to me,
out of joy I long for pain.
I have to flee from your kingdom
o queen!
Goddess, let me draw!

VENUS
(as if waking up from a dream)
What do i need to hear? What a song!
What dull tone does your song turn to?
Where did the enthusiasm fled to you,
the Wonnesang only commanded you?
What is it What was my love in?
Beloved, what are you accusing me of?

TANNHÄUSER
Thanks to your grace, praised be your loved ones!
Happy forever who stayed with you!
He envies forever those with warm urges
Divine embers shared in your arms!
Delightful are the wonders of your kingdom,
I breathe the magic of all delights here;
no country in the world offers the same,
what she possesses seems easily dispensable to you.
But I from these rosy scents
long for the forest to ventilate,
according to our clear blue sky,
after our fresh green of the meadow,
according to our little birds, dear song,
according to the sound of our bells:
I must flee from your kingdom!
O queen!
Goddess, let me draw!

VENUS

Faithless man! Alas! What is that you say?
You dare scorn my love?
You praise it, yet would fly from it?
Are you surfeited with my charms?

TANNHÄUSER
Oh lovely goddess, do not be angry with me!

VENUS
Are you surfeited with my charms?

TANNHÄUSER
Your overwhelming charm it is I flee from.

VENUS
Woe to you, traitor! Hypocrite! Ungrateful man!
I will not let you go! You may not go from me!

TANNHÄUSER
Never was my love greater, never truer,
than now, when I must fly from you for ever!
(At a sign from Venus a magic grotto is revealed)

VENUS
(jumping up from her bed)
Unfaithful! sore! what are you letting me hear
Do you dare to mock my love?
Do you praise them and still want to flee them?
Have I grown tired of my charm?

TANNHÄUSER
Oh beautiful goddess, don't want to be angry with me!

VENUS
Is my charm thriving?

TANNHÄUSER
It is your great charm that I flee!

VENUS
Woe to you! Traitor! Hypocrite! Ungrateful!
I do not let you! you must not pull from me!

TANNHÄUSER
My love has never been greater, never truer,
Than now, when I have to flee you forever! (Venus turned away with a scream, hiding her face in her hands. - Long silence)
(Then she gradually looks for Tannhauser gaze again, to which she suddenly turns with a seductive smile)(At your wink a magical grotto appears which you point to)

VENUS

Come, beloved, see yonder grotto,
filled with rosy fragrance gently wafting!
That abode of sweetest delight would offer
enchantment even to a god.
Lulled on the downiest of cushions
let every hurt fly from your limbs,
let coolness fan your burning brow,
blissful ardor swell heart.


Come, sweet love, come, follow me! Come!

CHOIR OF SIRENS

Draw near the beach!

VENUS
From the pleasant distance, sweet sound usage
my arm to enfold you in closest embrace:
from my lips, my gaze,
you sip nectar divine,
the reward of love sparkles for you:
a feast of delight shall arise from our union.
Let us joyfully celebrate the festival of love!
You must not dedicate a timid offering to it -
revel in union with the goddess of love!
Say, sweet friend, tell me, my beloved -
would you fly?

TANNHÄUSER


For you alone my song shall ever ring out!
Your praise alone be loudly sung by me!
Your lovely fascination is the fount of all beauty,
and every sweet wonder stems from you.
The glow you shed in my heart
blazes bright as flame for you alone!
Yes, against the whole world, then, untiring,
for henceforth your bold champion I will be!
Yet, I must go from hence to the world of earth;
if I remain with you, I can only be a slave.
For freedom, then, I long,
for freedom, freedom, do I thirst;
for struggle and strife I will stand,
though it be, too, for destruction and death:
from your kingdom, therefore, I must fly -
Oh queen
goddess, let me go!
VENUS
(beginning in a low voice)
Beloved come see the grotto there,
mildly pervaded by rosy scents;
Even a god would be delighted
the sweetest joys stay!
Soothed on the softest of feet,
flee your limbs every pain;
cool your burning head,
blissful embers swell through your heart!

(As she tries to gently pull him towards her)
Come on sweet friend, come follow me! come over!

CHOIR OF SIRENS
(invisible)
Approach the beach!

VENUS
From a distance, sweet sounds admonish,
that my arm embraces you in a cozy sewing;
from my lips, from my gaze,
do you sip the god potion,
the love thank you shines:
a celebration of joy shall arise for our covenant,
Let us celebrate the celebration of love joyfully;
you shouldn't give her a shy sacrifice:
indulge in the association with the love goddess!
Say, dear friend, say, my beloved:
do you want to flee?

TANNHÄUSER
(carried away to the extreme, grasping the harp again)

Always only you, only you should hear my song,
sung loud only be your price from me!
Your sweet charm is the source of all that is beautiful
and every wonderful miracle comes from you.
The glow that you poured into my heart
as a flame it burns brightly for you alone!
Yes, against all the world will indefatigably
henceforth I will be your bold warrior!
But I have to go to the world of the earth,
with you I can only become a slave;
I want freedom,
for freedom, freedom, I thirst;
I want to stand to fight and quarrel,
be it also for death and perishing! -
Therefore I must flee from your kingdom!
O queen!
Goddess, let me draw!
VENUS

Begone, madman, begone!
Go! Traitor, see, I am not stopping you!
Fly! I set you free!
Begone hence! Deluded mortal,
let that which you long for be your lot!
Begone! Begone!
Fly hence to frigid men,
before whose timid, cheerless fancy
we gods of delight have escaped
deep into the warm womb of earth.
Begone, deluded mortal, seek your salvation,
seek your salvation - and find it never!
Beg those for pardon now, whom once,
when victorious, in exultant mood
you derided and scorned; in those quarters you disdained,
cry out now for favor!
Let your infamy shine forth, then!
Their derision, then will be your utter shame!
Banished, accursed, oh, how well I see you
approach me already, your head bowed down to earth:
"Oh, if only you might find her again,
she who once smiled upon you!
Oh, that the portals of her delight
might once more open for you! "
On the threshold, see there -
he lies now, stretched full length,
there where once delight engulfed him!
Imploring, he begs for pity, not for love!
Back! Be off, beggar!
To heroes alone, to menials never, does my kingdom open!

TANNHÄUSER
No! My pride will spare you the complaining;
ever again to appear before you would degrade me!
He who parts from you today, oh goddess,
will never return to you again!

VENUS

Ha! You will never return?
What have I said?
Ha! What has he said?
Never to return to me!
What am I to think?
Now understand it?
My beloved leave me for ever?



VENUS
(in the fiercest anger)
Move there! Delusional beggar! Move there!
Go Traitor, see, I don't hold you!
Flee, i'll set you free
Move there! Beguiled!
what you ask is your lot!
Move there! move there!
Flee to the cold people,
before their stupid, gloomy madness
the gods of joy we escaped
deep in the earth warming lap.
Go, beguiled! Seek your salvation,
seek your salvation - and never find it!
You who once laughed victoriously,
the exultant courage you mock,
now beg her for mercy where you despise
now yell for hold!
Then shine your shame
the bright shame then becomes their mockery!
Banned, cursed, ha! how can I see
close your head to the earth: -
"o! if you thread it again,
who once smiled at you!
Oh! opened it to you again
the gates of their delights! "
On the threshold, look there!
he lies stretched out
where joy once flowed to him!
He begs for pity, not for love!
Back! Escape, beggar!
Never servants, only heroes will my kingdom open!

TANNHÄUSER
No! My pride shall save you the misery
I am dishonored to ever see you close!
Who will part with you today, O goddess,
he will never return to you!

VENUS
(with a scream)
Ha! you never returned! -
How do I say
Ha! how did he say
Never me back!
how should i think
How to grasp it!
My beloved flee from me forever?
(with slight hesitation)


How could I have deserved that?
How incurred such censure,
as would rob me of the pleasure
of forgiving my dear one?
To the queen of love,
to the goddess of all grace,
alone, should offering
her friend comfort be denied?
Smiling through tears, how once
I listened to you, yearning
to hear the proud song
that has been silent around me for so long!
Oh say, how could you ever suppose
I might remain unmoved if, some time,
your soul's sighing were to urge me,
if I were to hear your cry?
That in your arms supreme comfort I have found,
oh, for that, do not let me suffer.
Do not you one day scorn my solace!



If you do not return to me,
a curse, then, upon the whole wide world,
and may that from which the goddess withdraws
be for ever waste!



Oh, come, come back again!
Trust my favor, my love!

TANNHÄUSER
He who flies from you, goddess, flies from all favor for ever!

VENUS
Do not resist your longing from pride,
if it draw you back to me!

TANNHÄUSER
My longing urges me to combat;
I do not seek pleasure and rapture!
Oh, if you could understand it, goddess!
Hence, to the death I seek!
I am drawn to death!

VENUS
Return, when death itself flies from you,
when the grave itself closes before you.

TANNHÄUSER
How would I have acquired that
how should I be at fault
that robbed me of lust
to forgive the daring?
The queen of love
the goddess of all grace,
if only this had failed
Consolation for your friend at Christmas
As before, smiling with tears,
I listened longingly to you
to hear the proud song
who fell silent around me for so long;
O! Say how could you ever think
that I would remain unmoved,
urge your soul to me once
Sigh, did I hear your complaint?
That last consolation I found in your arms
Oh, don't let me pay for it,
Do not you once disdain my consolation either!

(breaking out in despair)

Won't you come back to me
so curse the whole world!
and forever be dreary,
from which the goddess departed!

(pleading desperately)

Oh come back, come back!
Trust my grace, my love!

TANNHÄUSER
Who, goddess, flees from you, flees all grace forever!

VENUS
Do not proudly deny your longing,
when you are drawn back to me!

TANNHÄUSER
My longing urges to fight
I am not looking for pleasure and pleasure!
oh, may you believe it, goddess!
Towards the death that I'm looking for
it urges me to die!

VENUS
Return when death itself flees you
when the grave itself closes in front of you.

TANNHÄUSER
I carry death and the grave here in my heart,
through repentance and atonement I will find myself repose!

VENUS
Repose will never be your lot,
neither will you find peace!
Come again to me, if, some time, you should seek your salvation!

TANNHÄUSER
Goddess of pleasure and delight, no!
Oh, not in you shall I find peace and repose!
My salvation lies in Mary!
(Venus vanishes. - The scene is changed quickly)


Death, the grave, here in my heart I carry
through repentance and atonement I find rest for myself!

VENUS
You will never rest
you never find peace!
come back to me, seek your salvation one day!

TANNHÄUSER
Goddess of bliss and lust!
No! oh, I don't find peace and quiet in you!
My salvation lies in Mary!
(Venus disappears. - The scene transforms quickly)


SCENE THREE

A green valley stretching between the Hörselberg and the Wartburg. Blue sky, bright sun. In the foreground is a shrine to the Virgin. A Shepherd Boy is blowing his pipe and singing. Sleep bells tinkle.




THIRD SCENE

Tannhäuser, who has not left his position, suddenly finds himself in a beautiful valley. Blue sky, bright sunlight. - On the right in the background the Wartburg; through the valley opening to the left you can see the Hörselberg. - On the right, halfway up the valley, a mountain path leads from the direction of the Wartburg towards the foreground, where it then turns sideways; In the same foreground is an image of the Virgin, to which a low mountain ledge leads up. - From the height on the left one can hear the ringing of hearth bells; on a high ledge sits a young shepherd with a shawm, facing the valley

SHEPHERD
Dame Holda's come out of the mountain
to roam through field and meadow;
my ear caught a sound there so sweet,
m'eye longed to behold.


There I dream many a sweet dream,
and my eyes had scarcely opened when
there the sun shone warm.
May, May had come!
Now I gaily play my pipe.
May is here, the lovely May!
(From the direction of the Wartburg, a band of Pilgrims approaches, singing)

OLDER PILGRIMS
To Thee do I journey, Lord Jesus Christ,
for You art the pilgrims' hope!
Praise be to thee, Virgin sweet and pure.
Grant that our pilgrimage may prove propitious!




THE SHEPHERD
Mrs. Holda came out of the mountain,
to go through corridors and meadows,
my ear heard a sweet sound
my eye longed to see.

(He plays)

I dreamed many a lovely dream
and when my eyes hardly opened,
the sun shone warmly,
May, May was coming.
Now I'm playing the shawm merrily,
May is here, dear May!
(You can hear the singing of the older pilgrims, who, coming from the direction of the Wartburg, are approaching on the mountain path. The shepherd plays on the shawm)

THE ELDERLY PILGRIMS
To you I, my Jesus Christ,
who are the pilgrim's hope!
Praise her, virgin sweet and pure,
the pilgrimage should be favorable!

(The shepherd, hearing the song,
stop at the shawm and listen
reverently to)


Alas, the burden of my sins weighs me down.
I can endure it no longer;
I will know neither sleep nor rest therefore
and gladly choose toil and vexation.
At the sublime feast of clemency and grace
I will atone for my sins in humility;
blessed is he who truly belives:
he shall be saved through penitence and repentance.

SHEPHERD


God speed! God speed to Rome!
Pray for my poor soul! (Tannhäuser falls to his knees, deeply moved)




TANNHÄUSER
Glory be to Thee, Almighty God!
Great are the marvels of Thy grace.



OLDER PILGRIMS
To Thee do I journey, Lord Jesus Christ,
for You art the pilgrims' hope!



Praise be to thee, Virgin sweet and pure.
Grant that our pilgrimage may prove propitious!



TANNHÄUSER

Alas, the burden of my sins weighs me down,
I can endure it no longer;
I will know neither sleep nor rest therefore
and gladly choose toil and vexation.

PILGRIMS

At the sublime feast of clemency and grace,
I will atone for my sins in humility;

blessed is he who truly belives.


Oh, the burden of sins weighs heavily on me,
can't take it any longer!
So I don't want rest or rest either
and gladly choose for me toil and plagues.
On the high feast of grace and grace,
I humbly atone for my guilt;
blessed are those who are faithful in the faith:
he is redeemed by repentance and repentance.

THE SHEPHERD
(when the pilgrims have arrived at the opposite height, shouting loudly to them, waving their hats)

Good luck for! Good luck to Rome!
Pray for my poor soul!

(Tannhäuser, who stood firmly rooted in the middle of the stage, falls violently to his knees)

TANNHÄUSER
Almighty, praise be to you!
Great are the miracles of your grace! (The procession of pilgrims turns left from here on the mountain path at the image of the Virgin Mary and thus leaves the stage; - the shepherd also moves away with the shawm to the right of the height, - one hears the hearth bells farther and farther away)

THE PILGRIMS
To you I, my Jesus Christ,
who are the pilgrim's hope!
(on the theater - more and more distant)

Praise be, virgin sweet and pure,
the pilgrimage should be favorable!

(The pilgrims here have the
Already left stage)


TANNHÄUSER
(on his knees, as if lost in fervent prayer)

Oh, the burden of sins weighs heavily on me,
can't take it any longer:
so I don't want rest or rest,
and gladly choose for me toil and plagues.
(Tears choke his voice; he bows his head low to the ground and seems like coming from Eisenach, one can hear bells ringing)

THE PILGRIMS
(very distant)
On the high feast of grace and grace,
I humbly atone for my guilt;
(French horn on the theater, removed)
blessed who is faithful in the faith.

(French horns removed. As the sound of the horns gradually approaches, the distant peal is silent)(Down from the hill to the left, from a forest path, the Landgrave and the singers appear individually in hunter's costume)

SCENE FOUR

LANDGRAVE
(catches sight of Tannhauser)

Who is that man yonder, sunk in fervent prayer?

WALTHER
A penitent surely.

BITEROLF
By his garb a knight.

TUNGSTEN


It is he!

WALTHER, HEINRICH THE WRITER, BITEROLF, REINMAR
Henry! Henry! Do I see aright?



LANDGRAF
Is it really you? Have you returned to the circle you
forsook in haughty arrogance?

BITEROLF
Say, what does your return signify for us?

LANDGRAVE AND SINGERS
Tell us what!

BITEROLF
Reconciliation? Or does it betoken renewed strife?

WALTHER
Do you approach us as friend or foe?

SINGERS
except
TUNGSTEN
As foe?

FOURTH SCENE

THE LANDGRAF
(seeing Tannhäuser halfway up)

Who is he there in fervent prayers?

WALTHER
A penitent.

BITEROLF
A knight in his costume.

TUNGSTEN
(first rushes to Tannhäuser and recognizes him)

He is it!

WALTHER, HEINRICH THE WRITER, BITEROLF, REINMAR
Heinrich! Heinrich! Do I see right?

(Tannhäuser, who was surprised and jumped up quickly, composes himself and bows silently to the Landgrave, after glancing at him and the singers)

LANDGRAF
Is it really you? You sweep in the circle
back that you proudly left in arrogance?

BITEROLF
Tell us what your return means to us?

THE LANDGRAF AND THE SINGERS
Say it

BITEROLF
Reconciliation? or is it another fight?

WALTHER
Do you approach us as a friend or an enemy?

THE SINGERS
except
TUNGSTEN
As an enemy?

TUNGSTEN
Oh, do not ask! Is this the bearing of arrogance?

(to Tannhauser)

Be welcome, you valiant singer,
who have been, oh, so long absent from our midst!

WALTHER
Welcome, if you come in peace!

BITEROLF
Welcome, if you call us friends!
Welcome! Welcome! We greet you!

THE OTHER SINGERS
except
TUNGSTEN
Welcome! Welcome! We greet you!

LANDGRAVE
Be welcome then to me as well!
Tell us - where have you tarried so long?

TANNHÄUSER
I have journeyed in far-distant realms -
there where I never found response nor rest.
Do not ask! I did not come here to contend with you.
Be reconciled with me and let me go on further!

LANDGRAVE
Not so! You have become one of us once more.

WALTHER
You may not go away.

BITEROLF
We will not let you go.

LANDGRAVE AND SINGERS
except
BITEROLF
Stay with us!

TUNGSTEN
O do not ask! Is this the expression of pride?

(He approaches Tannhauser in a friendly manner)

Greetings to us, you bold singer,
the ah! so long in our midst!

WALTHER
Welcome when you approach peacefully!

BITEROLF
Greetings when you call us friends!
Greetings, greetings, greetings to us!

THE OTHER SINGERS
except
TUNGSTEN
Greetings, greetings, greetings to us!

THE LANDGRAF
So be welcome to me too!
Tell me, where have you been for so long?

TANNHÄUSER
I wandered on, far away '-
where I never found rest or rest.
Do not ask! I did not come here to fight you;
be reconciled to me - and let me go on!

THE LANDGRAF
Oh no! You have become new to ours.

WALTHER
You are not allowed to move.

BITEROLF
We won't let you go

THE LANDGRAF AND THE SINGERS
except
BITEROLF
Stay with us!

TANNHÄUSER
Let me be! Delay avails me naught,
and never can I stop to rest!
My way bids me only hasten onward,
and never may I cast a backward glance!

LANDGRAVE AND SINGERS
Oh stay! You shall tarry with us,
we will not let you go from us!
you have sought us out, why hurry away
after so short a reunion?

TANNHÄUSER

Away, away from here!

SINGERS
Stay, stay by us!

TUNGSTEN

Stay by Elizabeth!

TANNHÄUSER
Elizabeth! - Oh heavenly powers,
do you cry out that sweet name to me?

TUNGSTEN
You shall not rebuke me as enemy, for that I have spoken it!
(to the Landgrave)
Do you permit me, sir, to be
herald of his good fortune to him?

LANDGRAVE
Tell him of the spell he has wrought,
and God grant him virtue,
that he may undo it aright.

TANNHÄUSER
Let me! No lingering pays me;
and I can never stand and rest!
My way only means hurrying forward
and I am never allowed to look backwards!

THE LANDGRAF AND THE SINGERS
Oh stay! You should stay with us,
we won't let you go!
You are looking for us, why hurry?
After such a brief reunion?

TANNHÄUSER
(tearing himself away)
Away, away from here!

THE SINGERS
Stay, stay with us!

TUNGSTEN
(Tannhauser stepping in the way, with a raised voice)
Stay with Elisabeth!

TANNHÄUSER
Elisabeth! - O power of heaven,
are you calling the sweet name to me?

TUNGSTEN
Don't you enemy scold me for calling him!
(to the Landgrave)
Will you allow me, Lord, that I
Proclaim his happiness to him?

THE LANDGRAF
Tell him the spell he wielded:
and God grant him virtue,
that he deserve to solve it!

TUNGSTEN
When you strove with us in blithe song,
sometimes victorious against our lays,
anon defeated through our art,
one prze there was that you alone succided in winning.
Was it by magic or by oure might
that you achieved the miracle
or captivating the most virtuous of maids
by your singing filled with joy and sorrow?
For, when, in haughtiness, you left us,
her heart closed to our song;
we saw her cheeks grow pale,
she ever shunned our circle.
Oh, return, you valiant singer,
let not your song be far from ours.
Let her no longer be absent from our festivals,
let her star shine on us once more!

SINGERS
except
TUNGSTEN

Be one of us, Henry, return to us!
Have one with dissension and strife!
Let our lays ring out in unison,
and brothers let us call ourselves from henceforth.

TUNGSTEN
Oh, return, you valiant singer!
Oh, return!
Let our lays ring out in unison,
and brothers let us call ourselves from henceforth.

LANDGRAVE
Oh, return, you valiant singer!
Have done with dissension and strife!


TANNHÄUSER
To her! To her! oh, lead me to her!
Ha, how I recognize it again,
the lovely world that I renounced!
The heavens look down upon me,
the meadows sparkle, richly-decked!
The spring, the spring
with a thousand lovely sounds
has entered into my soul, rejoicing!
In sweet impetuous urgency
my heart cries aloud:
To her, to her!
Lead me to her!
TUNGSTEN
When you denied us in bold chant,
you will soon be victorious against our songs,
by our art you soon suffered conquest;
it was a prize that you alone won.
Was it magic, was it pure power
through which you performed such miracles
of your song full of joy and sorrow
banished the most virtuous maiden?
Because oh! when you proudly leave us
locked her heart to our song;
we saw her cheek pale,
she avoided our circle forever.
O come back, you bold singer,
your song is not far from ours!
She is no longer missing the festivals,
her star shines again for us!

THE SINGERS
except
TUNGSTEN

Be ours, Heinrich, come back to us!
Second honors and quarrels are over!
Our songs sound together,
and brothers call us from now on!

TUNGSTEN
O come back, you bold singer!
O come back!
Our songs sound together,
and brothers call us from now on!

THE LANDGRAF
O come back, you bold singer!
Discord and quarrel are over (Tannhauser, deeply moved, throws himself into Wolfram's arms, warmly greets each of the singers one after the other and bows warmly in front of the Landgrave)

TANNHÄUSER
To her! To her! Oh, lead me to her!
Ha, now I recognize her
the beautiful world from which I have raptured!
Heaven looks down on me
the hallways are richly decorated!
The spring, the spring,
with a thousand lovely sounds
drew cheering into my soul!
In sweet, impetuous urges
my heart calls out loud:
To her! To her!
Lead me to her!

LANDGRAVE AND SINGERS
He, whom we had lost, is remaining!
A miracle has brought him hither!
Glory be to the sweet power
that has charmed his arrogance away!
Now may the high-born lady's ear
once more rake to our lays!
In joyous animated tones
the song goes up from every breast! (The whole valley fills with huntsmen)
(The Landgrave sounds his horn and is answered by loud blasts from every side. The curtain falls)




(During the foregoing, the Landgrave's entire hunted convoy with falconers etc. has gradually gathered on the stage.The hunters blow their horns)

LANDGRAF AND THE SINGERS
He returns, whom we lost!
A miracle brought him here!
Who summoned him to cockiness,
praised be the fair power!
Now listen to our high songs
the praised ear once more!
It resounds in happy, animated sounds
the song from every breast!
(The whole valley is now teeming with the hunting convoy, which is still growing stronger)
(The Landgrave and the singers turn to the hunters; the Landgrave blows his horn, loud horns blaring and male barking answers. While the Landraf and the singers mount the horses brought to them from the Wartburg, the curtain falls)






INTRODUCTION


SCENE ONE
(The Singers' Hall in the Wartburg)

ELISABETH
Dear hall, I greet thee once again,
joyfully I greet thee, beloved place!
In thee his lays awake
and waken me from gloomy dreams.
When he departed from thee,
how desolate thou didst appear to me!
Peace forsook me,
joy took leave of thee.
How strongly now my heart is leaping;
to me now thou dost appear exalted and sublime.
He who thus revives both me and thee,
tarries afar no more.
I greet thee!
I greet thee!
Thou precious hall,
receive my greeting!
(Tannhäser and Wolfram appear in the background)




INTRODUCTION


FIRST SCENE
(The singing hall on the Wartburg; in the background an unobstructed view of the courtyard and the valley)

ELISABETH
I greet you, dear hall,
I greet you gladly, beloved room!
His songs awaken in you
and wake me up from a dark dream.
Since he divorced you,
how boring you appeared to me!
Peace fled from me
the joy drew from you!
How now my bosom rises
so now you seem proud and dignified to me,
that revives me and you so
he is no longer far away!
Greetings!
Greetings!
You, dear hall,
Greetings!
(Tannhäser, led by Wolfram, appears with him from the stairs in the background)

SCENE TWO
(Elisabeth sees Tannhäuser)

TUNGSTEN
(to Tannhauser)
There she is; approach her without fear.
(He remains in the background)

TANNHÄUSER
(throws himself at Elisabeth's feet)

Oh princess!

ELISABETH

Heavens! Rise! Leave me!
I may not see you here!




TANNHÄUSER
You may! Oh, stay and let me
remain at your feet!

ELISABETH

Stand up then!
You shall not kneel here, for this hall
is your kingdom. Oh, rise!
Receive my thanks for your return!
Where did you tarry so long?

TANNHÄUSER
Far from here
in broad and distant lands. Deep forgetfulness
has descended betwixt today and yesterday.
All my remembrance has vanished in a trice,
and one thing only must I recall,
that I never more hoped to greet you,
nor ever raise my eyes to you.

ELISABETH
What was it then that brought you back?

TANNHÄUSER
It was a miracle,
an unbelievably sublime miracle!

SECOND SCENE
(Elisabeth sees Tannhäuser)

TUNGSTEN
(to Tannhäuser)
There it is: approach it undisturbed!
(He remains leaning against the wall parapet in the background)

TANNHÄUSER
(rushes violently to Elisabeth's feet)

O princess!

ELISABETH
(in shy confusion)
God! Get up! Let me!
I am not allowed to see you here!

(She makes a move
to move away)


TANNHÄUSER
You may! O stay and let '
at your feet me!

ELISABETH
(turns to him in a friendly manner)
So get up!
You shouldn't kneel here, because this hall
is your kingdom. O get up!
Thank you for returning!
Where did you stay for so long?

TANNHÄUSER
Far from here
in wide, wide lands; dense oblivion
has decreased between today and yesterday.
All my memories quickly faded away
and only one thing I have to remember
that I never again hoped to greet you
ever to lift my eye to you.

ELISABETH
Then what was it that brought you back?

TANNHÄUSER
It was a miracle
an incomprehensible miracle!

ELISABETH
I praise this miracle
from the bottom of my heart!

Forgive me if I do not know what I am about.
I am in a dream, and foolish as a child,
surrendered, powerless, into the power of the miracle.
I scarcely know myself more; oh help me
unravel my heart's enigma!
To the Singers' skilful lays
I used to listen often with great pleasure.
Their singing and their praise
seemed to me a pleasant show.
But what a strange new life your song
conjured up in my breast!
Now it would thrill through me like pain,
now penetrate me like sudden joy.
Emotions I had never experienced!
Longings I had never known!
That which once was dear to me vanished
before a bliss nameless heretofore!
And when you left us then,
peace and joy were gone from me.
The melodies the Singers sang
appeared insipid to me, melancholy their temper.
Dreaming, I experienced heavy sorrow,
my waking hours became a troubled delusion,
joy fled from my heart -
Henry! Henry! What had you done to me?

TANNHÄUSER

You must praise the god of love -
he plucked the strings for me,
he spoke to you in my lays -
he has led me to you!

ELISABETH
Praised be the hour,
praised be the power
that has brought me such sweet tidings
of your presence!
Encompassed about with radiant bliss,
sunshine smiles upon me;
awakened to new life,
I call happiness mine!

TANNHÄUSER
Praised be the hour,
praised be the power
that has brought me such sweet tidings
ELISABETH
I praise this miracle
from the bottom of my heart!
(moderating, in confusion)
Sorry if I don't know what to start with!
I am in a dream and more foolish than a child,
powerlessly surrendered to the power of miracles.
I almost don't know myself anymore ... O help me
to solve the riddle of my heart!
The singer wise sage
I usually like to listen and a lot;
their singing and their praising
seemed like a lovely game to me.
But what a strange new life
your song called into my chest!
Soon it will shake me like pain
soon it penetrated me like sudden pleasure;
Feelings that i never felt
Desire that I never knew!
What else was lovely to me had disappeared
with delights that have never been mentioned!
And when you have now left us,
was peace and joy gone;
the tunes the singers sang
appeared dull to me, dull their mind;
in the dream I feel dull pains,
my watchfulness became gloomy delusion; -
the joy drew from my heart: -
Heinrich! Heinrich! What did you do to me?

TANNHÄUSER
(excited)
You shall praise the God of love!
He touched the strings for me
he spoke to you from my ways,
he brought me to you.

ELISABETH
Praise be to the hour
praised be the power,
the customer so sweet to me
brought from your vicinity!
Surrounded by splendor,
laughs at the sun's light;
awakens to new life
I call joy mine!

TANNHÄUSER
Praise be to the hour
praised be the power,
the customer so sweet to me
from your lips.
To the newly-perceived life
I may bravely turn;
aquiver with joy, I call
its fairest wonder mine!

TUNGSTEN
(in the background)
Thus vanishes, for this life,
my every gleam of hope!


brought out of your mouth!
The newly recognized life
may I be brave;
I call in a joyful tremor
its most beautiful miracle mine!

TUNGSTEN
(in the background)
So flee for this life
every hope seems to me!

(Tannhäuser separates from Elisabeth; he goes up to Wolfram, gives him a big hug and walks away with him through the stairs)
(Elisabeth looks after Tannhäuser from the balcony)


SCENE THREE

(The Landgrave now enters and addresses Elisabeth)

LANDGRAVE
Do I meet you here in this hall you shunned for so long?
Does a festival of singing of our preparing attracct you then at last?

ELISABETH
Uncle! Oh my kindest of fathers!

LANDGRAVE
Do you wish
at last to open your heart to me?

ELISABETH
See in my eyes! I cannot speak!

LANDGRAVE
For a short while still, then,
let your sweet secret remain unspoken;
the spell remain unbroken
till you are mistress of its loosing.
So be it! That which his song so marvelously awoke
and stimulated, he shall reveal today
and crown with fulfillment.
Now the gracious art will come to fruition!

(Trumpets are heared from the background
as if from the courtyard of the castle)


The nobles of my land whom I have invited here
to a rare festival are approaching now;
they come more numerous than of wont, for they
have heard you are to be the festival's queen.


THIRD SCENE

(The Landgrave enters from a side door, Elisabeth rushes up to him and hides her face on his chest)

LANDGRAF
I'll meet you here in this hall, whom you avoided for so long?
Are you finally attracted to a song festival that we are preparing?

ELISABETH
My uncle! O my good father!

LANDGRAF
Urges
Is it you to finally open up your heart to me?

ELISABETH
Look me in the eye! I can't speak.

LANDGRAF
Still remain unspoken
your sweet secret short term;
the magic remains unbroken,
until you are able to solve it.
So be it! What is so wonderful about singing
awakened and stimulated, he should today
reveal and crown with perfection;
the fine art, it is now becoming an act!

(Trumpets in the background low,
like in the courtyard)


The nobles of my lands are already approaching,
which I sent here for the special festival;
they approach more numerous than ever since they
heard that you are the princess of the festival.


SCENE FOUR

(The Landgrave and Elisabeth ascend the balcony to watch the arrival of the guests; they are announced by the four noble pages, who receive from the Landgrave directions as to their reception)
(The Knights and Counts enter, one by one, with their ladies and their retinue. The latter remain in the background; the others are received by the Landgrave and Elisabeth)

KNIGHTS AND NOBLES
Joyfully we greet the noble hall,
where may art and peace alone linger ever,
and the joyous cry long ring out:
To the Prince of Thuringia, Count Hermann, hail!

LADIES
Joyfully we greet the noble hall,
where may art and peace alone linger ever,
and the joyous cry long ring out:
To the Prince of Thuringia, Count Hermann, hail!
(The assembled guests have now all taken their seats. The Landgrave and Elisabeth occupy seats of honor under a canopy, in the foreground)
(The Singers step forward and greet the assembly with dignified bows. They then take their seats, which are disposed in a narrow semicircle in the center of the hall)
(The Landgrave rises)

FOURTH SCENE

(The Landgrave and Elisabeth go to the balcony to check on the arrival of the guests. Four noble boys appear and report. They receive orders from the Landgrave to receive them, etc.)
(Trumpets in the courtyard)(From here on, the knights and counts enter individually with noble women and entourage, who remain in the background, and are received by the landgrave and Elisabeth)

CHOIR OF KNIGHTS AND NOBLES
We happily greet the noble hall,
where art and peace always dwell
where for a long time the call resounds
Thuringian princes, Landgrave Hermann, hail!

CHOIR OF NOBLEWOMEN
We greet the noble hall with joy
where art and peace always dwell
where for a long time the call resounds
Thuringian princes, Landgrave Hermann, hail!
(The assembled people have all taken the places assigned to them, forming a large semicircle. The Landgrave and Elisabeth take honorary seats in the foreground under a canopy)
(Trumpets on the theater)
(The singers appear and bow solemnly to the assembly with a knightly salute; then they take the seats reserved for them in a narrow semicircle in the empty center of the room, Tannhauser in the middle distance on the right, Wolfram at the opposite end on the left, opposite the assembly )
(The Landgrave rises)

LANDGRAVE
A great deal, much of great beauty, has been sung already
here in this hall by you, esteemed singers,
in sage mysteries and gladsome songs alike
you have rejoiced our hearts equally ingeniously.
If our swords in battles grim and bloody
did battle for the majesty of the German realm,
if we withstood the furious Guelphs
and averted ruinous dissention,
then no less a prize was carried off by you.
By your art you won
for grace and gracious custom,
for virtue and true belief,
wholly sublime, magnificent and glorious victory.
Then, prepare for us today a festival -
today when the valiant singer, whom we have grievously
missed for so long, has returned to us.
That which brought him back again among us,
appears to me a wondrous mystery;
through the art of song you shall reveal it to us.
Therefore I put the question to you now:
Could you fathom the true essence of love for me?
To the man who can do it, to him who celebrates
it most worthily in song, let Elisabeth present the prize,
let him claim it, exalted and bold as he will -
I will see she shall bestow it.
Up, beloved singers! Pluck the strings!
The task is set! Compete for the prize
and receive in advance all our thanks.


CHOIR
Hail! Hail! Hail to Thuringia's Prince!
Hail to the protector of the gracious art! Hail! Hail!
(All sit down)
(The four noble pages come forward and collect from each Singer, in a golden bowl, a small roll of paper bearing his name; they present the bowl to Elisabeth, who takes out one of the papers and hands it back to the pages. These read the name, and advance cerimoniously into the middle of the hall)

FOUR PAGES
Wolfram von Eschenbach, begin!
(Wolfram rises. Tannhauser leans upon his harp, seemingly lost in dreams)

LANDGRAF
Much and much was beautiful here in this hall
of you, dear singers, already sung,
in wise riddles, as in cheerful songs
do you delight our hearts in a meaningful way.
When our sword in bloody serious battles
fought for the majesty of the German Empire,
if we resisted the grim Welfen
and fended off the ruinous conflict:
so no less price was won by you.
Of grace and fair custom,
of virtue and pure faith
you fight through your art
very high, wonderfully beautiful victory.
So prepare a party for us today,
today, when the bold singer returned to us,
whom we so reluctantly missed for a long time.
What again brought him near us,
it seems to me a wonderful secret;
you shall reveal it to us through the art of song:
therefore I am now asking you the following question:
can you fathom the beings of love for me?
Who can do it, who sings it most worthily,
to whom Elizabeth riches the prize,
he challenged him as high and boldly as he wanted,
I make sure that she should grant it!
Up, dear singers! Grab the strings!
The task is set, fight for the price,
and take all of our thanks in advance!
(Trumpets on the theater)

CHOIR
Salvation! Salvation! Thuringia's princes hail!
The fair protector of art, salvation! Salvation! Salvation!
(Everyone sit down)
(The four noble boys step forward, they collect in a golden cup from each of the singers his name drawn on a rolled up sheet of paper; - then they hand the cup to Elisabeth, who pulls out one of the papers and in turn hands it to the noble boy; they read the name and then solemnly step into the center)

FOUR NOBLE BOYS
Wolfram von Eschenbach, start!
(They sit down at the feet of the Landgrave and Elisabeth. Wolfram rises. Tannhauser leans on his harp, as if falling into reverie)

SINGING COMPETITION

TUNGSTEN
When I cast my eye around this noble circle,
what a sublime spectacle makes my heart glow!
So many heroes, valiant, upright and judicious,
a forest of proud oaks, magnificent, fresh and green.
And ladies I behold, charming and virtuous,
a richly-perfumed garland of lovely blooms.
My glance becomes enraptured at the sight,
my song mute in face of such radiant loveliness.
I lift my eyes up yonder to one star
which stands fast in the firmament and dazzles me:
my spirit draws comfort from that distance,
my soul devoutly sinks in prayer.
And behold! Before me a miraculous spring appears,
which my spirit glimpses, filled with wonder!
From it, it draws bliss, rich in grace,
through which, ineffably, it revives my heart.
And never would I sully this fount,
nor taint the spring in wanton mood:
I would practice myself in devotion, sacrificing,
gladly shed my heart's last drop of blood.
You noble ones may gather from these words
how I do apprehend love's purest essence to be!

(He sits down)

KNIGHTS AND LADIES

Tis so! Tis so! Praised be your song! (Tannhäuser seems to awaken from a dream: his haughty mien now changes to an expression of ecstasy. He stares fixedly at nothing. A slight trembling of the hand - which has unconsciously sought the strings of the harp - and an uneasy smile indicate that a strange magic has taken possession of him. Then, as if awakened, he sweeps the harp string energically, his whole demeanour showing that he hardly knows now where he is, and that he is especially oblivious of Elisabeth)

TANNHÄUSER
Oh Wolfram, you who have sung thus,
have woefully misrepresented love!
If you languish so fearfully,
the world would come to an end, forsooth!
To praise God in the sublime and lofty distance,
raise your eyes to heaven, look up to his stars!
Worship is due to such marvels,
for one should not aspire to touch them!
But that which inclines to touch,
lies near the heart and senses,
that which, conceived of the selfsame stuff
in weaker mold, nestles to one -
I do boldly approach that fount of delight
with which no fear is ever mixed,
for the fount is inexhaustible,
as my longing is unquenchable!
That my desire may ever burn
I will ever refresh myself at the source!
THE SINGER WAR

TUNGSTEN
I look around in this noble circle,
what a great sight makes my heart glow!
So many heroes, brave, German and wise,
a proud oak forest, wonderful, fresh and green; -
and graceful and virtuous I see women,
lovely flowers fragrant wreath.
The look will probably get drunk from looking,
my song falls silent with such grace shine.
I look up to just one of the stars
who stands in the sky that blinds me: -
my mind gathers from every distance,
reverently the soul sinks in prayer.
And see, I see a miracle fountain
into which my mind looks with great astonishment:
from him he draws gracious bliss,
through which my heart he refreshes namelessly.
And I never want to cloud this well,
do not touch the source with wicked courage:
in adoration I would like to practice sacrificing myself,
gladly shed the last blood of my heart!
You noble ones may read in these words,
how I recognize love's purest essence.

(He sits down)

CHOIR OF KNIGHTS AND WOMEN
(in approving motion)
So it is! So it is! Praised be your song! (Tannhäuser starts up as if from a dream; his defiant expression immediately takes on the expression of delight with which he stares into the air in front of him; a faint trembling of the hand, which unconsciously searches for the strings of the harp, an uncanny smile in his mouth indicates that a strange magic is taking hold of him. When he then, as if awakening, reaches firmly into the harp, his whole demeanor reveals that he hardly knows where he is and does not pay any attention to Elisabeth)

TANNHÄUSER
O Wolfram, who you sang so
you have badly distorted love;
if you fear in such longing,
the world certainly dried up!
To god's praise in high places,
look up to the sky, look up to its stars:
Worship such miracles,
since you are not supposed to understand them!
But what bends to touch,
is close to your heart and mind,
what is produced from the same material,
hugs me in a soft shape:
I boldly approach him, the source of bliss,
in which no hesitation ever mixes,
because the well is inexhaustible,
how my desire never dies:
so that my longing burns forever;
lab at the source I am forever!
Then know, Wolfram, thus do I conceive
love's true essence to be!
(General consternation; Elisabeth is a prey to conflicting emotions of rapture and anxious astonishment)


BITEROLF
Outside to fight us all!
Who could remain calm, when he hears you?
If it please your arrogance,
then rake, now, to me, too, blasphemous!
When sublime love inspires me,
it tempers my weapon with courage;
that it may remain forever unshamed,
I would proudly shed my last drop of blood.
For women's honor and highest virtue
as a knight I wield my sword;
but that which indulgence offers your youth
is cheap and not worth a blow.

KNIGHTS AND LADIES

Hail, bitterolf! Here are our swords!

TANNHÄUSER

Ha, foolish boaster Biterolf!
Do you sing of love, surely wolf?
It's certain you cannot have meant
that which seems fraught with delight to me!
Poor thing! What, then, have you enjoyed?
Your life has not been rich in love
and that which gave rise to pleasure in you
is truly not worth a blow!

KNIGHTS

Don't let him finish! Put a stop to his audacity!

LANDGRAVE
(to Biterolf, who has drawn his sward)
Up with your sword! Keep the peace, you Singers!

TUNGSTEN
(rises. A profound quiet ensues)

Now, oh heaven, be moved by my entreaty!
Grant my song the gift of divine inspiration!
Let me see sin banished from
this noble and unpollucted circle!
To thee, sublime love, that hast
penetrated in angelic beauty
and know, Wolfram, so know
love truest being me.
(General astonishment. Elisabeth in conflict with secrecy and anxious alienation)
(Biterolf gets up quickly and angrily)

BITEROLF
Out to fight us all!
Who would keep calm, does he hear you?
Will your arrogance please
so hear me, vile, now me too!
When high love inspires me
she steals my weapons with courage;
that she would remain unabashed forever,
I proudly shed my last blood!
For women's honor and high virtue
as a knight I fight with the sword;
but what enjoyment of your youth
is cheap, not worth a trick!

CHOIR OF KNIGHTS AND WOMEN
(with raging applause)
Hail, Biterolf! Here is our sword!

TANNHÄUSER
(driving up with increasing heat)
Ha, foolish braggart Biterolf!
Do you sing of love, grim wolf!
You certainly didn't mean
what seems to be enjoyable to me!
What did you, poor boy, enjoy?
Your life was not loving,
and what joys sprang from you,
that was really not a prank!

THE KNIGHTS
(in great excitement)
Don't let it end! Fend off his boldness!

THE LANDGRAF
(to Biterolf, who draws the sword)
Back the sword! You, singers, keep peace!

TUNGSTEN
(rises; at the beginning of it, the greatest calm immediately returns)

Oh heavens, let me implore you now!
Give praise to my song of consecration!
Banned let me see the sin
from this noble, pure circle!
To you, great love sounds
inspires my singing,
deep into my heart,
may my song ring out inspired!
Thou dost approach like a messenger of God,
I follow thee from the fair distance -
thou leadest thus into the lands
where thy star ever shineth.

TANNHÄUSER

To thee, goddess of love, shall my song ring our!
Now let thy praise solution aloud by me!
Thy honeyed fascination is fount of all beauty,
and every sweet wonder stems from thee!
That man who has held thee locked in passionate embrace,
knows what love is, and he alone.
Poor creatures, who have never enjoyed her love,
fare hence, fare hence into the Venusberg!


LANDGRAVE AND SINGERS
Ha, the villain! Fly from him!
Hear it! He has been in the Venusberg!

KNIGHTS AND LADIES
Ha, the wicked! Flee him!
Hear it! He was in the Venusberg!
Away! Away out of his presence!
(The Ladies retire horrified, Elisabeth alone remaining)

to me in angelic beauty
penetrated deep into the soul!
You approach as a messenger from God,
I follow from a lovely distance:
so you lead into the country,
where your star shines forever!

TANNHÄUSER
(jumps up, in utter ecstasy)
To you, goddess of love, my song should sound,
sung loud be your price from me now!
Your sweet charm is the source of all that is beautiful
and every wonderful miracle comes from you!
Whoever wrapped you in his arms with glow,
only he knows what love is!
Poor people who never enjoyed their love
move there! Move into the mountain of Venus!
(General departure and horror)

THE LANDGRAF AND THE SINGERS
Ha, the wicked! Flee him!
Hear it! He was in the Venusberg!

CHOIR OF KNIGHTS AND WOMEN
Ha, the wicked! Flee him!
Hear it! He was in the Venusberg!
Away! Away, up close!
(All women leave the hall in the greatest dismay and with gestures of disgust. Elisabeth, who had listened to the singers' quarrel with growing fear, remains alone from the women - pale, only with the greatest expenditure of her strength on one of the wooden pillars of the canopy upright. - The landgrave, all knights and singers have left their seats and come together. - Tannhauser, on the extreme left, remains for a while as if in ecstasy)

LANDGRAVE. SINGERS. KNIGHTS

You heard it! His wicked lips
have made horrible confession of his sin.
He has shared in hellish delights,
he has sojourned in the Venusberg!
Frightful! Revolting! Damnable!
Steep your swords in his blood!
Sent back to the bottomless pit,
let him be condamned, let him be banished!
(They threaten Tannhäuser with drawn swords; Elisabeth throws herself between them)

ELISABETH
Hold!


LANDGRAVE. SINGERS. KNIGHTS
What do I hear? What's this? What do I see? Elizabeth!
The chaste maid siding with the sinner!

ELISABETH

Back! I take no heed else of death!
What is the wound dealt by your swords
to the death blow I received from him!

LANDGRAVE AND SINGERS
Elisabeth! What am I obliged to hear?
How can your heart allow you to be so infatuated,
as to exorcise punishment from the man
who has so shamefully betrayed you?

KNIGHTS
Elisabeth! How can you be so infatuated,
as to exorcise punishment from the man
who has so shamefully betrayed you?

ELISABETH
What do I matter? But he - his salvation!
Would you rob him of his eternal salvation?

LANDGRAVE. SINGERS. KNIGHTS

He has cast away his every hope,
never will he win salvation!
The curse of heaven has fallen upon him,

let him go hence in his sin!

THE LANDGRAF. THE SINGERS. CHOIR OF THE KNIGHTS

You heard it! His wicked mouth
made the crime known terribly;
he shared hell's lust,
he stayed in the Venusberg!
Terrible! Awful! Curse!
The sword wets his blood!
Sent back to the hell pool,
be taken away, be banned!
(All penetrate with drawn swords on Tannhauser, who takes a defiant position; Elisabeth falls between them)

ELISABETH
Stop!
(All stop in deep dismay)

THE LANDGRAF. THE SINGERS. CHOIR OF THE KNIGHTS
What do i hear How? What do i see Elisabeth,
the chaste virgin for the sinner?

ELISABETH
(Covering Tannhäuser with her body)
Back! Otherwise I do not respect death!
What is the wound of your iron against
the death blow that I received from him?

THE LANDGRAF AND THE SINGERS
Elisabeth! What do i need to hear?
How did your heart make you so bewitched
from whom to swear the punishment,
who betrayed you so terribly?

CHOIR OF THE KNIGHTS
Elisabeth! How did you let yourself be so enchanted
from whom to swear the punishment,
who betrayed you so terribly?

ELISABETH
What is up to me But he - his salvation!
Do you want to rob him of his eternal salvation?

THE LANDGRAF. THE SINGERS CHOIR. THE KNIGHT

He has rejected all hope
salvation will never gain him!
Heaven's curse has hit him!
(They invade Tannhauser from a new one)
in his sins he go there!

ELISABETH
Away from him! You are not his judges!
Inhuman wretches, throw your furious swords from you
and give heed to the pure maid's words!
Learn from me what is God's will!
Why should the unhappy man,
whom a fearful mighty magic
holds captive, not attain salvation
through repentance and atonement in this world?
Do you who are so strong in true belief
thus misconstrue the counsel of the highest?
If you would rob a sinner of hope, then say,
what harm has he done you?
Behold me, the maid whom he destroyed
with one swift blow in the flower of her youth,
who loved him deep in her soul,
and whose heart he pierced, exulting!
I pray for him, I pray for his life,
may he turn his step penitently towards atonement!
May the spirit of belief he granted him anew
since for him, too, the Savior suffered once!

TANNHÄUSER




Woe, woe is me, unhappy mortal!

LANDGRAVE AND SINGERS

An angel has descended from the shining firmament
to make God's holy counsel known. See there, you infamous betrayer,
acknowledge your misdeed!
You dealt her death, she begs for your life -
Who could remain stern when he hears the angel's prayer?
Though I may not forgive the culprit
yet I cannot oppose heaven's command.

KNIGHTS
See there! See there, you infamous betrayer!
Look upon her!
You dealt her death, she begs for your life -
Who could remain stern when he hears the angel's prayer?
Though I may not forgive the culprit
yet I cannot oppose heaven's command.

TANNHÄUSER
To lead the sinner to salvation
God's messenger drew near me!
But, oh, to touch her wantonly
ELISABETH
Back from him! You are not his judges!
Cruel ones! Throw the wild sword from yourselves!
And give a hearing to the pure virgin word!
Hear from me what God's will is!
The unfortunate one caught
a terribly powerful spell holds
how? should he never come to salvation,
through atonement and repentance in this world?
You who are so strong in pure faith
do you so fail to recognize the Supreme Council?
If you want to rob the sinner's hope,
so say what he hurt you?
See me, the virgin, whose blossom
suddenly it broke,
who loved him deeply,
who jubilantly stabbed the heart!
I plead for him, I plead for his life;
remorseful to repent he steers the step!
The courage of faith be given to him anew,
that the Redeemer once suffered for him too!

TANNHÄUSER
(gradually from the height of his excitement
and his defiance sunk down by Elizabeth's intercession
violently seized, collapses in contrition)


Sore! Woe to me misfortunes!

THE LANDGRAF AND THE SINGERS
(gradually calmed down and touched)
An angel rose from light ether
to proclaim God's holy advice! Look, you disgraceful traitor!
Be aware of your iniquity!
You gave her death, she prayed for your life!
Who would stay rough, does he hear the angel's plea?
May I also not forgive the guilty party
I cannot resist the word of heaven!

CHOIR OF THE KNIGHTS
Look! Look, you disgraceful traitor!
Look at them!
You gave her death, she prayed for your life!
Who would stay rough, did he hear the angel's plea?
I must never forgive the guilty
I must not resist the angelic word!

TANNHÄUSER
To lead the sinful to salvation,
the messenger of God approached me;
but oh! to touch her wickedly,
I raised my dissolute gaze to her!
Oh Thou, high above this land of earth,
Who sent the angel of my salvation to me,
have mercy on me who, oh, so deep in sin,
shamefully failed to recognize heaven's mediator!
Have mercy on me! Have mercy on me!
Oh, have mercy on me!

ELISABETH
I pray for him, I pray for his life!
May the spirit of belief he granted him anew
since for him, too, the Savior suffered once!


LANDGRAVE
A fearful wrong has been committed.
With dissembling mask, the accursed
son of sin came crawling to us.
We cast you out from among us: with us
you may not tarry; our hearth is stained with shame
through you, and heaven itself looks threateningly
upon this roof, which has sheltered you too long already.
However, a way to deliverance from eternal damnation
stands open before you: rejecting you,
I point it out to you. Make use of it for your salvation!
Gathered together on my lands
is a great concourse of pilgrim penitents.
The older ones have gone on before already,
the younger are still resting in the valley.
Trifling though their transgressions be,
their hearts will give them no rest;
to still the devout distress of repentance
they are marching towards Rome for the feast of grace.

LANDGRAVE. SINGERS. KNIGHTS
You must go along with them on pilgrimage
to the city of clemency and grace,
in the dust there to fall prostrate
and atone for your sin!
Before him who pronounces the sentence
of God, cast yourself down;
but never more return,
if you do not receive his blessing! Though our anger has been forced to soften,
because an angel checked it,
this sword will despatch you,
if you linger in sin and disgrace!

ELISABETH
Let him journey to thee,
Thou God of clemency and grace!
Forgive him, who has fallen so low,
I raised my blasphemous look at her!
O you, high above this earth,
who sent me the angel of my salvation!
Have mercy on me, who, ah! so deep in sin
shameful misjudgment of heaven's mediator!
Have mercy on me Have mercy on me
Oh, have mercy on me!

ELISABETH
I beg for him, I beg for his life!
The courage of faith be given to him anew,
that the Redeemer once suffered for him too!
(The Landgrave solemnly steps into the center)

LANDGRAF
A terrible crime was committed;
it stole itself with a hypocritical larva
to us the son of sin laden with curse!
We push you away, with us you can
don't linger! Our hearth is stained with shame
through you, and the heavens look threateningly
on this roof that has been hiding you for too long!
To save from eternal ruin
there is a way open to you: pushing you from me,
I show it to you: use it for your salvation!
Gathered are from my lands
repentant pilgrims, many in number;
the older ones turned ahead,
the younger ones were still resting in the valley.
Only for the sake of minor sin
their hearts do not let them rest;
to satisfy the pious urge to repent,
draw them to Rome for the Feast of Mercy.

THE LANDGRAF. THE SINGERS. CHOIR OF THE KNIGHTS
Thou shalt walk with them
to the city of grace,
fall down there in the dust
and atone for your debt;
before him fall down,
who speaks God's judgment!
But never come back
his blessing was not given to you! Our vengeance must give way,
because she broke an angel
this sword will reach you
you wait in sin and shame!

ELISABETH
Let it flow towards you,
you God of grace and grace!
To him who fell so deep
the guilt of his sin!
For him only will I pray,
may my life be prayer;
grant that he may see Thy light,
before he is lost in night!
In joyful trepidation,
let a sacrifice be dedicated to thee!
Take, oh, take my life:
I no longer call it mine!

TANNHÄUSER
How shall I find pardon?
How atone for my guilt?
My salvation I have seen vanish,
haven's favor flies from me.
Yet I will travel repentant,
beat my breast,
fall prostrate in the dust -
contrition be my chosen lot.
Oh, that the angel of my hour of need
who, though so insolently mocked by me,
yet offered herself for me as sacrifice
might be reconciled with me!

YOUNGER PILGRIMS

At the sublime festival of clemency and grace.
I will atone for my sin in humility.
Blessed is he who truly belives!
He shall be saved through penitence and repentance.


forgive the guilt of sins!