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German Egg Cup Museum, February 10, 2020

The "WORLD champions"

A small Dutch town is home to what is by far the largest collection of egg cups in the world. Riek and Ad Koetsier have only been collecting since 1980 and have already sold an impressive 42,000 different copies.

This large number is very noteworthy because today the two only collect egg cups made of ceramic materials and with a foot. So the classic, well-known shape.

German Egg Cup Museum, February 10, 2020

The "WORLD champions"

The world's largest egg cup collection is housed in a small Dutch town. Riek and Ad Koetsier have only been collecting since 1980 and have already assembled an impressive 42,000 different specimens.

This large number is very noteworthy because today they both only collect egg cups made of ceramic materials and with feet; the classic well-known form.

The collection quickly became so large that space problems arose. The first step, however, was to buy more showcases. Then came the specialization in porcelain and ceramic egg cups with feet. And then Ad built a large wall with vertical pull-outs for 8,000 egg cups, as you know from pharmacies. When he retires there, he jokingly says that he is going to the medicine cabinet.The collection quickly became so large that space problems arose. The first step, however, was the purchase of additional display cases. Then came the specialization in porcelain and ceramic egg cups with feet. Then Ad built a large wall-disoplay with vertical drawers, for 8,000 egg cups like those found in pharmacies. When he withdraws there, he jokingly says that he goes to the medicine chest.

Video

Click on the picture and you will see more!
Click on the picture and you will see more!

Up to a size of 1,000 pieces, the Koetsier family was able to remember which egg cups they already had and thus avoid double purchases. After that it became necessary to keep records. First a notebook was bought and all egg cups were described. But it quickly turned out that was not "the yellow one of the egg" and they had to think of something else. Ad developed a sophisticated system for cataloging all egg cups. A photo is taken of each piece and all other data is inserted into a database that we developed ourselves. The uploading then takes place on your own website.

Ad's database contains a serial number for each egg cup, information about the date of purchase, the cost, a description, the country of origin, damage and special marks.

After first searching flea markets and antique shops for egg cups, Riek and Ad are now buying up smaller collections on a large scale. The Koetsier family has also received donations from entire collections. On Ad's Hompage there are 145 former collections from the Netherlands and Germany that have been incorporated into the collection of the “world champions”.

In 2018, the storage facilities were bursting at the seams and the Koetsier family decided to build on. In one extension, 85 new pull-outs could be installed, which gave the collectors an additional 30,000 more parking spaces. In total, the two Dutchmen now have 70,000 storage spaces for their collection.

Before the collection reached 1,000 pieces, the Koetsier family could still remember which egg cups they already had and thus avoid double purchases. After that it became necessary to keep records. First a notebook was bought and all egg cups were described. However, it quickly turned out that this was not the solution and they had to think about something else. Ad developed a sophisticated system for cataloging all egg cups. A photo of each piece is taken and all further data is inserted into a self-developed database. Afterwards the information is uploaded on their own website.

Ad's database contains a serial number for each egg cup, information about the date of purchase, the cost, a description, the country of origin, damage and special characteristics.

At first Riek and Ad scoured flea markets and antique shops for egg cups, but now they buy smaller collections on a large scale. The Koetsier family has already received gifts from entire collections. On Ad's homepage alone there are 145 former collections from the Netherlands and Germany that have been included in the “World Champion” collection.

In 2018 the storage facilities burst at the seams and the Koetsier family decided to extend. 85 additional vertical drawers were installed in an extension, which gave the collectors room for an additional 30,000 specimens. The Dutch couple now have room for a total of 70,000 spaces for their collection.
 

Translation: Lesley Kilby
                                                                                                                                                                    
© Nico Diener

 

 


District messenger Fürstenfeldbruck, March 29, 2018

Looking for eggs ... mug

> Gudrun Jahreiss from Grafrath <

The Kreisbote Fürstenfeldbruck has called on collectors to apply to the editorial team within four weeks. Over 35 entries were received in this way. Deciding which collectors to introduce and the stories behind them was not an easy one. But the choice has been made. Here is the first of twelve glimpses into the life of a collector.

Striped, dotted, with fruit motifs or wood grain, in the form of a pirate's head, made of shiny metal, marble, plastic in neon colors or white ceramic with filigree flower drawings - the variety of egg cups is almost limitless. Most egg lovers do not even know this spectrum, as the simple cups from the tableware set are often in the cupboard. But Gudrun Jahreiss has them all. Since 2005 the Grafratherin has been collecting the “Throne of the Eggs”. A home visit:


Egg cups in every imaginable shape

When you enter the couple's kitchen, you immediately see two showcases. There, Eicherbecher models from the 1920s line up alongside beakers in the form of Bart and Homer Simpson from the TV series. If you go around the dining table, you stand in front of the third showcase. Long, scantily clad legs come to a mug. Ten of these erotic egg cups share the space there with wooden cups, cups in the shape of a head, regular goblets made of clay, eight cups with the word "egg" always in different scripts and many more.

Own room for 2,000 collectibles

The showcases are masterpieces in themselves - built by Gudrun's husband. He's a locksmith and accepts his wife's passion for collecting, "but he doesn't want to be flooded by Eicher cups," as Gudrun Jahreiss knows. And that could happen. Because anyone who thinks that there are around 250 egg cups in the kitchen is wrong. The remaining egg cups - over 2,000 in number - have their own room on the second floor of the house. There is one collector's item after the other in a giant showcase - neatly sorted according to material, shape and pattern. Because the beauty of some egg cups only comes out when you look at them from above, her husband built showcases that are set into the floor of this room. For example, a mouse that lies on its back and on whose belly you could place an egg.

An exhibition was decisive

With all the neatly draped cups, most of them naturally ask the question: How did she get into this hobby? “In 2005 I visited an egg cup exhibition with a school class in the Fürstenfeldbrucker Museum,” explains the former teacher. She was so enthusiastic about this presentation that when she got home she realized straight away in her own closet: “I already have ten different ones”. Then the big collecting started.

On the hunt for the cups

She made good catches on the Internet at auctions, at flea markets and also on the bulky waste. “I've always tried to spend as little money as possible,” she says. Mostly it was only one or two euros. “I once spent 25 euros in a shop on an old set,” she recalls. In her search for new treasures, she came into contact with other collectors. “We shared our booty from flea markets and auctions because most of the time you buy sets but only need a cup,” she explains. At that time, many small parcels left Grafrath and innumerable ones piled up in front of her front door. Up to 20 egg cups were added to their collection per month. But she, and especially her husband, quickly realized that there were too many cups. "Where is this going?" She asked herself. She decided against the salt shaker - which she also collected at the beginning - and in favor of the egg cups. Then said room was furnished.


Only collect yourself satisfied

She broke off contact with the collectors anyway. “Because I quickly realized that collecting is only fun when I start walking myself,” she says. So she had to break down the collector's instinct that she felt herself. So many packages didn't help. “In the meantime, it's more about quality than quantity.” But she is still happy about gifts. “In February my sister brought me an egg cup from Cologne, which was thrown into the audience by a car as a promotional gift at Carnival,” she says.


Learned a lot and overcome computer shyness

In addition to collecting, sorting is Gudrun Jahreiss's second passion. “All of this has brought me a lot of education personally,” she concludes. She has dealt a lot with materials, especially porcelain, art epochs and cultures. Because the egg cup has changed in shape, pattern and meaning over time. She also overcame her computer shyness by collecting. "Before that, I never dared to use the computer, but the collector's instinct helped me overcome myself," says the now 57-year-old, who incidentally was born on an Easter Sunday. “Even as a child, I liked Easter better than Christmas,” she reveals. If she hadn't been to Africa until recently, the whole house would have been decorated.


There are other egg cups on the table

When she and her husband eat boiled eggs - and they usually do that every Sunday - they don't get a mug out of the cabinet, but from the kitchen cupboard. And there are: simple, white, matching the rest of the dishes.

Text: Miriam Kohr / Photos: Miriam Kohr

 


German Egg Cup Museum, February 29, 2016
 

"The world champions"
at the Easter egg market in Filsum


Last weekend the annual Easter egg market took place in Filsum in East Frisia (Lower Saxony, Germany), where visitors saw the most varied decorations of eggs of all sizes and were able to stock up on many Easter decorations. Marianne Groß organized the event for the 24th time and was delighted that the town hall of the Jümme municipality was also very well filled this year. 43 exhibitors showed what you can do with the egg and all the trimmings and offered more than 3000 eggs and Easter decorations.

As every year, the "world champions" Riek and Ad Koetsier from the Netherlands were represented with an egg cup stand.

Each egg cup has its own special place

The sales booth was mostly crowded with customers and several hundred egg cups changed hands in the two days to decorate the next Easter tables.

Ina Möller and Nico Diener from the German Egg Cup Museum and the collector Günther Int-Veen from Baden-Württemberg (Germany) also came to use the presence of the "world champions" for technical discussions. The discussions were about special collection areas and the planned "online museum".

Pic: Nico Diener, German Egg Cup Museum

 

 

 

            
               »
The world champions«
at the Easter egg market in Filsum

Last weekend the annual Easter egg market took place in Filsum, East Friesland (Niedersachsen, Germany) at which the visitors saw the most varied decorations of all sizes of eggs and were able to stock up on many Easter decorations. Marianne Groß organized the event for the 24th time and was thrilled that the town hall of the Juemme community association was very well attended. 43 Exhibitors showed just what is possible to do with eggs and trappings and offered over 3,000 eggs and Easter decorations.

Like every year the “World champions” Riek and Ad Koetsier from the Netherlands were present with an eggcup stand.

The sales table was mostly surrounded by customers and during the two day event several hundred eggcups changed hands in readiness for Easter tables.

Ina Moeller and Nico Diener of the German Eggcup museum and Collector Guenther Int- Veen from Baden-Württemberg, Germany, had also traveled there to join the “World champions” for technical discussions. The discussions focused on special collections and on the planned “on-line museum”.

 

AG 24, February 28, 2016

His eggs are only available in silver

Schkeuditz - Egg cups used to be considered a luxury good. Only the rich could afford it, and they preferred to lift the egg on a small ornate throne. Edgar Hofmann from Schkeuditz would like to remind you of this. He tracks down rare silver egg cups.


A flawless hobby: Edgar Hofmann collects silver egg cups

His districts are flea markets. There, equipped with a magnifying glass, he can see very special cups. The collector is not interested in porcelain, clay or plastic ones.

Edgar Hofmann prefers noble pieces made of silver or decorated with silver. “Most of them are more than a hundred years old and artistically engraved,” explains the collector and shows one of his most beautiful specimens: a piece of silver jewelry with a stylized cricket that makes music.

Often there are also first names, initials or dates on the cups.


The collector prefers only fine pieces.

"In the past, they were often given as a baptismal gift in illustrious circles," says Edgar Hofmann.

His passion for collecting doesn't come cheap. He usually has to put around 50 to 70 euros on the table for a silver disc.

An exception, yes an exception, is a tortoiseshell egg cup with silver inlays from the 18th century. “My wife discovered it at the Leipzig flea market.” He's still happy about it today. Because at a price of three hundred euros, he needed her blessing.

The Hofmanns now own over 100 silver egg cups, which they store neatly in showcases. Once a year they are polished to a high gloss.

Curious: The couple themselves don't put egg cups on the table. “We don't care about breakfast eggs,” says Angelika Hofmann.

Thomas Gillmeister, photos: Picture Point / Kerstin Kummer

 



German Egg Cup Museum, April 22, 2015 (Source dpa)

Leipziger Museum is dedicated to breakfast

The Leipzig Grassi Museum of Applied Arts has designed an exhibition on breakfast culture around toasters, coffee pots and egg cups.

Since Friday, 300 exhibits from the museum's holdings have been on view in the show. It is about the change in the morning table culture in different countries and epochs. The exhibition runs until May 31st.


 


German Egg Cup Museum, February 28, 2015

The "World Champion" on the move                                                                                                   

It is no secret: Riek and AdKoetsier from Epe in Holland have undoubtedly the world's largest collection of egg cups (see also below). Since they have also been buying entire collections for many years, the double "egg dopjes", as the Dutch say, are piled up in their barn. Reason enough to offer them to the public again for sale.

Last weekend they set up their stand at the Easter egg market in the tranquil German town of Hameln. The booth with the many egg cups was very well received and Riek and Ad enjoyed the weekend, the atmosphere and the conversations with the visitors. The sale covered the stand fees, room and board in Hameln. On Monday they looked at the historic city center of the "Pied Piper City" and then started their journey home.



Weekend 7./8. March the two of them can be seen with their egg cup stand at the Easter egg market in Filsum (Ostfriedland) and are also looking forward to visiting other collectors. Those for whom the path is too far do not have to do without the offer. At http://www.eierdopjes.nl/ruilned.html everyone can look at the huge ensemble of double egg cups and swap with Riek and Ad or buy from them. The small pots are available at sensational prices from € 0.50 to € 4.00.

Photo: Archive Koetsier © Nico Diener

 


German Egg Cup Museum, December 21, 2014

Martha Stewart's collection

The American television presenter and cook Martha Stewart deals, inter alia, with also with egg cups, their history, shapes and special designs. This video can be found on the net.


click
 


German Egg Cup Museum, May 14, 2014

3 X 4 = 12

Every egg cup collector has space problems at some point. You are happy when even small free spaces on the walls can offer space for your beloved treasures.

The German Egg Cup Museum presented a resourceful solution today.It is a small wooden box with 3 X 12 compartments, each with plenty of space for an egg cup. At the front there is a door with an acrylic glass panel. With the small dimensions of 18 X 33 cm, these boxes can easily be placed anywhere where other elements do not fit or appear too bulky.
The storage boxes were originally designed as "tea boxes" and should be used lying flat. But you can just as easily hang them anywhere where there is still space and maybe even where there are no egg cup vats. In the hallway, in the toilet, in the kitchen or in the winter garden.
As an "Asian cheap product", these boxes are surprisingly neatly processed and can attract more attention to small groups of egg cups.

Available in every KRÜMET branch or in the KRÜMET online shop
Price € 3.95 / piece
Nico
 


Märkische Allgemeine, April 19, 2014

Crazy about egg cups

If the Easter Bunny existed, he would feel particularly at home with Ingrid Heym. The woman from Bergfeld has the right cup for eggs of every color - a total of 455 from all over the world. Made of wood, porcelain, fired clay and brass or silver.

Bergfelde - Over the years she has brought some of the cups with her as souvenirs, many others are gifts from relatives and friends. Because everyone knows: She is always particularly happy about that. The foundation stone for her passion for collecting was laid in 1979. In the estate of their landlord at the time, there was a good handful of egg cups with the city's coat of arms. Görlitz, Goslar, Rhine Falls, Neuschwanstein, Venice. From then on she looked for such souvenirs herself. “I like to go to junk shops, but not just for egg cups,” says the 77-year-old. However, there would always be a reason to go into a store. "I love to browse."

The latest piece in the collection is an egg cup from Morocco, terracotta with a gold rim. It only came about three weeks ago. Other exhibits come from Tunisia, China, Russia, Slovakia, England, Uzbekistan and the Netherlands. Many islands are also represented: Rhodes, Malta, Menorca, Bornholm. The specimens made by the grandchildren themselves from modeling clay, plaster of paris and baked clay are also of great ideal value.

Ingrid Heym has been keeping records of her collection since 1997. Most cups have a number. Under the doily on the sideboard there is a list with handwritten keywords about the origin. The first exhibits are not yet listed, however, regrets the senior citizen, who is also active in popular solidarity. In the current edition of the association newspaper "Lebenslustige" she is presented with her hobby. However, Ingrid Heym's interest is not limited to egg cups. The former laboratory assistant at Milchhof Berlin keeps fit in the garden and in the gym and likes to walk in the Nordic way. She grows her own flower seeds and knits.


The foundation stone for Ingrid Heym's passion for collecting was laid in 1979.
There was a good hand in the estate of her former landlord
full of egg cups with city arms. Görlitz, Goslar, Rhine Falls, Neuschwanstein,
Venice. From then on she looked for such souvenirs herself.

And she deals with the historical component of her passion for collecting. Because the existence of egg cups has been documented since the Roman Empire. A mosaic from Antioch from the year 40 BC shows a meal with eggs in cups and accompanying spoons. A silver egg cup with a spoon was excavated from the volcanic ash in Pompeii. The culture apparently lost itself until the 16th century, when egg cups came back into fashion in aristocratic circles. It was not until the end of the 19th century that egg cups became part of everyday porcelain.

Ingrid Heym doesn't have any favorite specimens, except maybe the nice grandma and the likeable grandpa in the form of a cup. But actually she doesn't like to commit herself. Everyone's beautiful. Incidentally, many pieces are used regularly. Because the senior citizen appreciates a neat breakfast egg - not just at Easter.
Helge Treichel
 

 

MDR television, April 17, 2014

The Lord of Things introduces

Günter Höhne is also Easterly: he shows egg cups from 40 years of the GDR. The cups were all made of plastic and they were stackable. One egg is like another? Not with the containers! Design expert Günter Höhne guides you through 40 years of egg cup culture in the GDR.


click on the picture
 


De Nieuwsbode Zeist,April 15, 2014

Egg, egg, egg: cups and shakers are very popular

Easter, brine, egg cups and salt shakers seem to form an invisible unit in Schönebeck. While the Solepark is calling for salt shakers to be made available for an exhibition, the Schönebecker Petra Grimm-Benne already has 300 egg cups in the showcase.

Schönebeck - There are many reasons to collect. Be it scientific curiosity, the claim to preserve cultural assets for posterity, to document developments or simply out of passion. Our museum landscape with its collections is just as diverse as the motives and the collectors. No collection is random, each one has a story and is thus a bridge between our cultural past and the present. Following this theme, collections are also made in the Kunsthof Bad Salzelmen. Based on its history, the employees of the Kunsthof have been collecting various exhibits for years. There is also a story to tell about many of them. What is collected there in the Kunsthof? Salt shakers in all their variations.


This is Petra Grimm-Benne's favorite egg cup: a penguin,
who holds an egg. | Photo: Heike Heinrich

Anyone wishing to marvel at or even expand the collection in the Kunsthof on the occasion of International Museum Day is cordially invited. "Anyone who contributes an extraordinary exhibit to the collection can even look forward to a free guided tour as part of the Museum Day," promises Solepark director Sibylle Schulz. On the occasion of Museum Day, on May 18, the employees of the Kunsthof Bad Salzelmen offer special tours through the Kunsthof and the graduation tower. "On this day, visitors can bring their salt shaker - as a gift or as a permanent loan - with them," says Sibylle Schulz.

The International Museum Day has been proclaimed annually by the International Museum Council (ICOM) since 1977. Its aim is to draw attention to the importance and diversity of museums. At the same time, he encourages visitors to explore the treasures kept in the facilities. Since 1992 the day has been accompanied by an annually changing motto. With the aim of bringing the museum landscape into the public eye, the International Museum Day in Germany has stood for the cultural diversity and cultural federalism of our country for years.

Not only salt shakers are collected in Schönebeck. Petra Grimm-Benne has a very special passion: she collects egg cups. She was fascinated - and infected - by an exhibition in Dessau. Since then she has always been on the lookout for copies in order to build up her own collection - at flea markets, on vacation, in other cities in general. She now owns 300 pieces, from traditional to modern. Your favorite egg cup has the shape of a penguin. The friends of the Schönebeckerin already know how to make her happy: "It's my birthday at the end of April, so I often get some for free."

And one thing is already certain: when Petra Grimm-Benne sets the table for Easter breakfast, it will be colorful. Different egg cups are then mandatory. "My kids think it's crazy," she admits.