The boy out of nowhere benidorm night life

Set the table, gold donkey, and clubs out of the sack (1837)

[214]
Set the table, donkey, and clubs out of the sack.

Times ago there was a tailor who had three sons and only one goat. But the goat, because it fed everyone together with its milk, had to have good food and be taken out to pasture every day; and the sons did it one by one. Once the eldest took them to the churchyard, where the most beautiful herbs were, made them eat and jump around. In the evening, when it was time to go home, he asked “Goat, are you full?” The goat answered

"I'm so full,
I don't like a leaf: meh! meh! "

"So come home," said the boy, took her by the rope, led her into the stable, and tied her up. "Well," said the old tailor, "does the goat have its proper feed?" "Oh," answered the son, "it is so full, it doesn't like leaves." But the father wanted to see for himself, went down to the stable , stroked the dear animal, and asked "Goat, are you full too?" The goat answered

“What should I be fed up with?

I just jumped over Gräbelein,
and found not a single leaf: meh! meh! "

"What do I have to hear!" Cried the tailor, ran upstairs, and said to the boy, "Hey, you liar, say the goat is full, and have you starved it?" And in his anger he took the cubit from the wall, and chased him out.

The next day it was the turn of the second son, who looked for a place with lots of good herbs, and the goat ate them all. In the evening, when he wanted to go home, he asked “Goat, are you full?” The goat answered

"I'm so full,
I don't like a leaf: meh! meh! "

"So come home," said the boy, pulled her home and tied her up in the stable. “Well,” said the old tailor, “does the goat have its proper food?” “Oh,” replied the son, “she's so full, she doesn't like leaves.” The tailor didn't want to rely on that, went down into the Stall, and asked "Goat, are you full too?" The goat answered

“What should I be fed up with?
I just jumped over Gräbelein,
and found not a single leaf: meh! meh! "

"The wicked villain!" Shouted the tailor, "to starve such a pious animal!" Ran up and beat the boy out the front door with his cubit.

It was now the turn of the third son, who wanted to do his job well, looked for bushes with the most beautiful arbor [216] and let the goat eat it. In the evening, when he wanted to go home, he asked “Goat, are you full too?” The goat answered

"I'm so full,
I don't like a leaf: meh! meh! "

"So come home," said the boy, led her into the stable and tied her up. "Well," said the old tailor, "does the goat have its proper feed?" "Oh," answered the son, "it is so full, it doesn't like leaves." The tailor didn't trust it, went down and asked, "Goat, are you full too? ”The malevolent animal answered

“What should I be fed up with?
I just jumped over Gräbelein,
and found not a single leaf: meh! meh! "

“O the brood of lies!” Cried the tailor, “one as godless and negligent as the other! you shall no longer fool me! ”and he jumped up with anger, and tanned the back of the one boy with the cubit so violently that he jumped out of the house.

The old tailor was now alone with his goat. The next morning he went down to the stable, caressed the goat, and said, “Come, my dear little animal, I will lead you to the pasture myself”. He took her by the rope and brought her to green hedges and under sheep ribs and whatever the goats like to eat. “You can fill yourself up to your heart's content,” he said to her, and let her graze until evening. Then he asked "Are you fed up with the goat?" She answered

"I'm so full,
I don't like a leaf: meh! meh! "

"So come home," said the tailor, led her into the stable and tied her up. When he went away, he turned around again and said, "Now you're full for once!" But the goat didn't make it any better for him, and called

“How am I supposed to be full?
I just jumped over Gräbelein,
and found not a single leaf: meh! meh! "

When the tailor heard this, he was startled and saw that he had innocently cast out his three sons. "Wait," he cried, "you ungrateful creature, there is still too little to chase you away, I want to draw you so that you are no longer allowed to be seen by honest tailors." his head and shaved it off as smoothly as the palm of his hand. And because the cubit would have been too honorable, he fetched the whip and struck it so much that it ran away in gigantic leaps.

The tailor, sitting so lonely in his house, fell into great sadness, and would have gladly had his sons again, but no one knew where they had got to. The eldest had apprenticed to a carpenter, where he studied hard and indefatigably, and when his time was up to go for a hike, the master gave him a little table that had no special reputation and was made of ordinary wood. but it had one good quality. If you can [218] and said “Little table, cover yourself”, the good little table was suddenly covered with a clean cloth, and there was a plate, and a knife and fork next to it, and bowls with boiled and roasted food, as much space as possible, and one a large glass with red wine shone so that one's heart laughed. The young journeyman thought “you have enough for your life with that,” went around the world in good spirits, and did not care at all about whether an inn was good or bad, whether there was something to be found in it or not. When it occurred to him, he didn't stop at all, but in the field, in the forest, on a meadow where he felt like it, he took his little table from his back, put it in front of him, and said, "Cover yourself," that was everything there what his heart desires. At last it occurred to him that he wanted to go back to his father, that his anger would have subsided, and with the little table setting he would like to take it up again. It so happened that on the way home in the evening he came to an inn which was full of guests; they welcomed him and invited him to sit down with them and eat with them, otherwise he would hardly get anything else. “No,” replied the carpenter, “I don't want to take the few bites in front of your mouth, you'd better be my guests.” They laughed and said he was having fun with them. But he put his little wooden table in the middle of the room and said, "Little table, set yourself up." Immediately it was filled with food as well as the landlord could not have brought in, and the smell of which rose to the guests' nostrils. [219] “Taken, dear friends,” said the carpenter, and the guests, when they saw what it was meant to do, did not ask twice, they approached, drew their knives, and bravely grabbed it. And what amazed her most when a bowl was empty, a full one immediately took its place by itself. The landlord stood in a corner and watched things, didn't know what to say, but thought, "You could use such a cook in your inn." The carpenter and his company were funny until late at night, but finally they went to sleep, and the young companion went to bed too, and put his wish-table against the wall. But the landlord's thoughts didn’t let him rest, it occurred to him that there was an old table in his lumber room that looked just like this: he fetched it very gently and exchanged it for the wish-table. The next morning the carpenter paid his bed-money, packed up his little table, did not even think that he had a wrong one, and went on his way. At noon he arrived at his father's, who received him with great joy. "Well, my dear son, what did you learn?" He said to him. “Father, I became a carpenter.” “A good craft,” replied the old man, “but what did you bring with you from your wanderings?” “Father, the best thing I have brought is the little table.” The tailor looked at it and said "you haven't done a masterpiece on that, it's an old and bad little table". “But there is a little table,” answered the son, “if I put it down and tell him [220] it should match, so the nicest dishes are on it and a wine that delights the heart. Just invite all your relatives and friends, they should feast and refresh themselves, because the little table will fill them all. "When the company was together, he put his little table in the middle of the room and said," Little table, set yourself up. "But the little table did not move and remained as empty as another table that does not understand the language. Then the poor fellow noticed that the little table had been swapped for him, was ashamed that he stood there like a liar, and the relatives laughed at him, and had to wander home again without being drunk or eaten. The father fetched his rags again and went on cutting, but the son had to go to work with a master craftsman.

The second son had come to a miller and had an apprenticeship with him. When his years were over, the master said, "because you have behaved so well, I will give you a donkey of a special kind, it does not pull on the wagon, and it does not carry any sacks either". "What use is it then?" Asked the young journeyman. "He spits gold," replied the miller, "if you put him on a cloth and speak Bricklebrit, the good animal will spit out gold pieces for you, back and front." "That is a beautiful thing," said the journeyman, thanking him Master and moved into the world. If he needed gold, he only had to say Bricklebrit to his donkey, and it rained gold pieces, and he had no trouble but to pick them up from the earth. Wherever he went, the best was good for him [221] enough, and the more expensive, the better, because he always had a full bag. When he looked around the world for a while, he thought, "You must go to your father if you come with the donkey, he will forget his anger and take you well." It happened that he ended up in the same tavern. in which his brother's table was swapped. He led his donkey by the hand, and the landlord wanted to take the animal from him and tie it, but the young journeyman said, "Don't bother, I will lead my gray horse into the stable myself, and tie it myself, because I need to know." Where he stands. ”The landlord found that strange, and he thought that someone who looked after his donkey himself had little to eat, but when the stranger reached into his pocket and took out two gold pieces, he said he should only do something good shopping for him, so he widened his eyes, ran and looked for the best that he could find. After the meal the guest asked what he owed, the landlord did not want to save the double chalk and said he had to buy a few more gold pieces. The journeyman reached into his pocket, but his gold was just running out. "Wait a moment, Herr Wirth," said he, "I just want to go and get gold;" but took the tablecloth with him. The landlord didn't know what that meant, was curious, crept after him, and when the guest locked the stable door he looked through a knothole. The stranger spread the cloth under the donkey, called Bricklebrit, and instantly the animal began to spew gold from behind and in front, so that it was neat [222] rained down on the earth. “Well, a thousand,” said the landlord, “the Ducats will soon be shaped! Such a purse is not bad! ”The guest paid his bill and went to sleep, but the landlord crept down into the stable during the night, led the mint master away, and tied another donkey in his place. The next morning in the morning the journeyman left with his donkey, thinking he had his gold donkey. At noon he arrived at his father's, who was happy to see him again and gladly welcomed him. "What happened to you, my son?" Asked the old man. "A miller, dear father," he replied. "What did you bring with you from your wandering?" "Nothing more than a donkey." "There are enough donkeys here," said the father, "I would have preferred a good goat." "Yes," answered the son, " but it is not a common donkey, but a gold donkey: when I say Bricklebrit, the good animal will spit you a whole cloth full of pieces of gold. Just have all the relatives call in, I'll make them all rich people. ”“ I'll put up with that, ”said the tailor,“ then I won't have to torture myself any further with the needle, ”he jumped off and called the relatives over . As soon as they were together, the miller bade them make room, spread out his handkerchief, and brought the donkey into the room. "Now watch out," he said, and called Bricklebrit, but it wasn't gold pieces that fell down, and it turned out that the animal knew nothing of art, for not every donkey can get that far. Then the poor miller made a long face, saw that he had been cheated, and asked the [223] Relatives for forgiveness who went home so poor when he came. There was nothing left, the old man had to pick up the needle again, and the boy hired a miller.

The third brother had started his apprenticeship with a wood turner, and because that is an artful craft, he had to learn the longest. But his brothers reported to him in a letter how they had fared and how the landlord had deprived them of their beautiful wishes on the last evening. When the turner had finished learning and was supposed to hike, his master gave him a sack because he was so comfortable and said, “There is a club in it.” “I can put the sack around and it can serve me well But what's the stick in it, it just makes it difficult. ”“ I'll tell you that, ”replied the master,“ if someone has hurt you, just talk stick out of the sack and the stick will jump you out among the people and dance around on their backs so gleefully that they cannot move or move for eight days; and sooner he won't let go than until you say stick in the sack, "the journeyman thanked him, put the sack around it, and if someone came too close to him and wanted to hit the body, he said stick out of the sack, like that The club jumped out and patted the coat or doublet off one by one on the back, and did not wait until he had taken it off; and it went so quickly that before anyone knew it would be his turn [224] was. In the evening the young turner arrived at the inn where his brothers had been betrayed. He put his satchel on the table in front of him and began to tell what strange things he had seen in the world. “Yes,” he said, “you can probably find a little table, a donkey and the like: all good things that I don't despise, but none of that is compared to the treasure I've acquired and with me there in mine Sack lead. ”The landlord pricked up his ears:“ What in the world may that be? ”He thought,“ The sack is probably filled with precious stones; I should have that cheap too, because all good things come in threes. ”When it was time to sleep, the guest stretched out on the bench and put his sack under as a pillow. The landlord waited until he thought he was lying in a deep sleep, then he walked over, moved and pulled very gently and carefully on the sack, to see if he could perhaps pull it away and put another one under it. The turner had waited a long time, just as the landlord was about to give a hearty jolt, he called Knüppel, out of the sack. Immediately the stick came out, on the landlord's body, and rubbed his seams so that it had a kind. The innkeeper shouted for mercy, but the louder he shouted, the harder the club hit him on the back with the beat until he finally fell to the ground, exhausted. Then the turner said, "If you don't give the little table and the donkey out again, the dance should start all over again." "Oh no," cried the landlord very meekly, "I'll be happy to give everything back again, [225] just let the goblin crawl back into the sack. ”Then the journeyman said,“ I want mercy for justice, but watch out for harm! ”Then he shouted“ Stick in the sack! ”and let him rest.

The next morning the turner took you with the little table and the donkey home to his father. The tailor was pleased when he saw him and asked him, like his brothers, what he had learned. “Dear father,” he replied, “I've become a turner.” “An artful craft,” said the father, “what did you bring with you from your journey?” “A valuable piece, dear father,” said the son, “ a club in the sack. ”“ What! ”cried the father,“ a club! it is worth the effort! You can cut it off from any tree. ”“ But not one like that, dear father: if I say stick out of the sack, the stick jumps out and does a bad dance with someone who doesn't mean it well to me, and does not let up until he lies on the ground and asks for good weather. You see, with this club I brought back the table setting and the donkey that the thieving landlord had taken from my brothers. Now have them called over and invite all relatives, I want to feed and water them, and I want to fill their pockets with gold. ”The old tailor didn't really want to trust, but he brought the relatives together. The turner then covered a cloth in the room, brought the donkey in, and said to his brother, "Well, dear brother, talk to him." The miller [226] said Bricklebrit, and instantly the gold pieces jumped down on the cloth, as if there was a downpour, and the donkey did not stop until everyone had so much that they could no longer carry. (I can see from you, you would have liked to have been there too.) Then the woodturner fetched the table and said, "Dear brother, now talk to him." the most beautiful bowls fully occupied. A meal was held there such as the good tailor had never seen in his house, and all the relatives stayed together until late at night, and were all merry and happy. The tailor locked needle and thread, yardstick and iron in a cupboard, and lived with his three sons in joy and glory.

But where did the goat go, the fault was that the tailor chased his three sons away? I want to tell you. Ashamed of her bald head, she ran into a fox den and crawled into it. When the fox came home, a pair of large eyes sparkled at him from the darkness, so that he was startled and ran back again. The bear met him, and since the fox looked quite disturbed, he said, “What is the matter with you, Brother Fox, what kind of face are you?” “Oh,” answered the Rothe, “a fierce animal sits in my cave, and gazed at me with fiery eyes. ”“ We'll drive that out, ”said the bear, went with him to the cave, and looked inside; but when he saw the fiery eyes, fear also changed him: he [227] wanted nothing to do with the fierce beast, and took it out. The bee met him, and when she noticed that he was not feeling well in his skin, she said, "Bear, you are looking very annoyed, where has your merriment gone?" "You talk well," replied he Bear, "there is a fierce beast with goggle eyes sitting in the red man's house, and we cannot chase it out." I want to see if I can help you. ”She flew into the fox's cave, sat down on the goat's smooth, shaved head and stabbed it so violently that it jumped up, meh! meh! screamed, and how great the world went, and no one knows where it went at this hour.