But use of commas with

Variants of but: yes, but, but

Main clause variant: yes

A variant of but is with the same verb position but. However, it sounds like that but more upscale and is rarely used in colloquial language.

Example: yes
I invited him to my party but he did not come.
I invited him to my party but he did not come.

Main clause variant: however

A variant of but with a different verb position is however. At however the verb is in position 2. However also belongs to the upscale style of speech and is rarely used in colloquial language.

Example: however
I invited him to my party but he did not come.
I invited him to my party however he didn't come.

Restricted main clause and subordinate clause variant: rather

A restricted variant of but is rather. Rather is used when a "direct contrast" is expressed in two sentences on a topic.

Example: 2 sentences
Peter doesn't put his money in a savings account. Peter buys stocks.
"Topic": "Investing money"
"Direct contrast": "savings book - shares" (= Where do you invest money?)

The first sentence must always contain a negation. Rather is always in the second sentence. It is not possible to change the rates.

Example: but
He doesn't put his money in a savings account rather he buys stocks.

Rather, it can combine two main clauses or two subordinate clauses in which an opposite is expressed.

Example: but (connection of HS / HS)
He doesn't invest his money in a savings account, he buys stocks.

Example: but (connection of NS / NS - causal)
He made a lot of money because he didn't put his money in a savings account, but (because he) bought shares.

Example: but (connection of NS / NS - conditional)
You can make a lot of money if you don't invest your money in a savings account but (if you) have bought shares.

For connecting parts of sentences with rather see: Clause connection: and, or, but, but

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