Who lives on a millionaire line, floated

Childhood in disaster: Yemen is threatened with famine

First the civil war, then the corona crisis. Now the dramatic situation in Yemen is getting worse: the country, which has been shattered by bloody conflicts, is on the brink of famine. Millions of people don't know how to survive the next few months.UN experts estimate that the number of people at acute risk could rise from 3.6 to 5 million by mid-2021.

The people in Yemen suffer from the consequences of the five-year civil war: Many families have lost everything because of the fighting. Due to the economic effects of the war and the corona pandemic, parents can no longer afford the bare minimums to feed their children. In addition, there have recently been severe floods and a plague of locusts in parts of the country, which have affected food production. Millions of children are malnourished and go to bed hungry every night.

What is of particular concern to us at UNICEF: Many aid projects are dramatically underfunded. The consequences for the children are dire: they can die of severe malnutrition. They don't get vaccinations against deadly diseases. And they don't get any more water. We must act now, before it is too late.

The catastrophic situation for children and their everyday life during the war can hardly be put into words. With rarely seen pictures from on site, we give you an insight into the life of families.

5 YEARS OF DESTRUCTION AND VIOLENCE

The bloody war in Yemen has been going on for over five years. The destruction shows up in all aspects of life.

Saleh is being treated at the hospital in Aden for severe acute malnutrition. He is looked after there around the clock. Gradually he is getting better.

© UNICEF / UNI313433

These two premature babies need extra oxygen to breathe. They were only left in the incubator for three days because there is far too little medical equipment in the hospital.

© UNICEF / UN073967 / Clarke for UNOCHA

Rayan was getting a glass of water in the kitchen when a bomb hit his house. He lost his arm. He has to go to the hospital regularly to have his prosthesis adjusted.

© UNICEF / UNI338366 / Alzekri

A student stands in the ruins of his former classroom, which was destroyed in the war. Two million children in Yemen cannot go to school.

© UNICEF / UN073959 / Clarke for UNOCHA

Where there are now only destroyed houses, there used to be a traditional market. The bombs hit houses, schools, shops and hospitals again and again.

© UNICEF / UN073958 / Clarke for UNOCHA

FAWAZ'S SURVIVAL STORY

Two million children in Yemen are malnourished and in need of urgent treatment. Tens of thousands of them have died. Fawaz survived. He is one of the children who fought for their life. When the following photo was taken, the then 18-month-old boy had been in the hospital for a month.

© Giles Clarke for UNOCHA

When he was admitted, he was critically malnourished and suffered from acute watery diarrhea and vomiting. Fawaz was extremely weak. At first he could hardly keep the therapeutic milk that was given to him. Several times he hovered between life and death.

© Giles Clarke for UNOCHA

The poor condition of his skin is also a symptom of his severe malnutrition. Fawaz's back is badly injured - the consequences of malnutrition are obvious.

© Giles Clarke for UNOCHA

His mother Rokaya did not move from his side and stayed by his bedside in the hospital day and night. Then his condition improved: the medication and special food took effect and Fawaz recovered. He was released after two months in hospital.

© Giles Clarke for UNOCHA

A few months later, Fawaz (here with his two older brothers) is barely recognizable. Despite all the adversities, he made it. Medical aid in the hospital, financed with donations, saved his life.

"Children in Yemen need lasting peace and stability in their country. Until that is achieved, we must do everything we can to save lives and protect children."

- Sara Beysolow Nyanti, Head of UNICEF Yemen

300 bars of hand soap to protect against corona
300 packets of peanut paste against malnutrition
50 canisters for 20 liters of drinking water each

ON THE NEWBORN STATION

© Giles Clarke for UNOCHA

Sofia holds her newborn twins tight in the maternity ward of Al-Sadaqah Hospital in Aden. She is originally from Somalia, but has been living in Yemen as a refugee for 15 years. She gave birth to nine children, but lost three of her children at birth.

© Giles Clarke for UNOCHA

The babies in these photos are just two days old. Sofia never lets her out of her sight: The two boys sleep in cardboard boxes right on their bed. There are no beds of their own for them. But Sofia is glad that this hospital is still open at all.

© Giles Clarke for UNOCHA

OVER 3 MILLION REFUGEES IN THEIR OWN LAND

15-year-old Ibtissam has lost both parents. They died in 2015, leaving eight children behind. Now Ibtissam is the only breadwinner in the family.

© Giles Clarke for UNOCHA

Ibtissam is one of more than three million people in Yemen who had to leave their homeland and flee. She lives with her seven siblings in an informal tent settlement for displaced people, about 100 kilometers north of the capital Sana'a.

© Giles Clarke for UNOCHA

In the makeshift camp in which they live, Ibtissam and her siblings are completely on their own. Most days they only eat tea and dry bread. Sometimes the neighbors, who barely have enough to live on, give them some food.

© Giles Clarke for UNOCHA

The refugee Yemenis live in the most inhospitable conditions in the refugee camps, in cramped and unsanitary conditions. A sandstorm is approaching in this displaced person camp in North Yemen. At the water point, fetching water is now even more difficult than usual.

© Giles Clarke for UNOCHA

Ashwak is 14 years old. She is responsible for fetching water in her family. Yemen is one of the most arid countries in the world.

© Giles Clarke for UNOCHA

Five years of war have severely damaged the country's water systems. Several million people in Yemen have no access to clean water and are directly dependent on our water supplies.

TOGETHER AGAINST THE TRAGEDY IN YEMEN

Stories like Fawaz's show how our aid in Yemen saves children's lives every day. Millions of children in Yemen can only survive if we continue to care for them. But there is a dramatic funding gap for our aid programs in Yemen. Please help to close this gap and continue to care for the children in Yemen!

Let us now stand by the children in Yemen together!

300 bars of hand soap to protect against corona
300 packets of peanut paste against malnutrition
50 canisters for 20 liters of drinking water each

* Note: The portraits and information on this page are based on a website of OCHA, the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs.