How to lace a bicycle wheel

Lace up sneakers properly

Cleverly threaded: 7 cool ways to lace your sneakers

There are actually no instructions on how to lace sneakers correctly. There are too many different methods, different sneakers and, of course, different tastes. In addition, it can be said that not every lacing is equally suitable for every kicker and all laces. But salvation is near! There are a few lacings that just don't go out of style and look great on many models. I have put together a (of course expandable) list of methods for you, which can make something extraordinary out of even the most normal shoe. Because let's face it: The standard way of cross-over has long been obsolete.

If you are still looking for good laces for your first attempts at lacing, we can also recommend the laces from Laced Up Laces.

Method 1: straight bar

Example on the Nike Air Max 1 Essential, Colorway: Birch / Dark Atomic / Teal Sail / Poison Green.

The laces do not cross, but run parallel. By the way, this method only works if you use an even number of eyelets. Straight bar looks particularly good on low tops, e.g. the classic vans. You have to note that with this method you use relatively little string and therefore probably have long ends.

  1. Thread the lace from the outside to the inside through the lowest pair of eyelets so that the ends of the same length hang out below the eyelet strip.
  2. The left end (seen from you) goes directly through the next upper eyelet. The other end skips an eyelet.
  3. Both ends can now be threaded into the opposite eyelet.
  4. Both ends are now on the right.
  5. Both ends skip an eyelet again, so that they virtually alternate. They're both threaded to the left side in where the whole thing repeats.
  6. Since you have now reached the last two pairs of eyelets (both ends are on one side again), you are still threading the lower end through the opposite eyelet. The other goes through its last one above as usual.
  7. When both ends meet again, you're done.

This is how you should proceed with the Straight bars.

Method 2: the ladder

Example on the Puma R698 X Alife, Colorway: Peach Bud / Lyons Blue.

The method is often used in the military because they lace the shoe particularly tightly. A relatively large amount of cord is used here. Either you pull everything very tight so that you can thread all the eyelets through or you swap the laces for something longer.

  1. Thread the lace from the inside out through the lowest pair of eyelets so that the ends of the same length hang roughly above the eyelet strip.
  2. Thread both ends from the outside to the inside through the next upper eyelet, so that a kind of loop is created.
  3. Pull both ends crosswise to the opposite side.
  4. Before one end goes into the next eyelet, it is threaded under the loop that has been created between the first two eyelets. Only then does it go through the next upper eyelet (again from the outside to the inside, of course). You may have to loosen the loops a little.
  5. In between, it's good to tighten everything again, as that will be difficult once you're done.
  6. This method (cross over, pull through loop, pull through eyelet) is repeated until the sneaker is finished.

Step by step to the ladder.

Method 3: the saw teeth

Example on the JC Play Platform Sneaker (60mm), colorway: white.

Looks like the beam method with diagonals underneath. Both ends pull in different ways and can correct badly fitting sneakers.

  1. Thread the lace from the outside to the inside through the lowest pair of eyelets so that the ends of the same length hang out below the eyelet strip.
  2. The left end goes through the next upper eyelet. The opposite is threaded diagonally to the other side through the third eyelet (inside out).
  3. Both ends are now threaded straight through the opposite eyelet so that they hang on the right eyelet strip.
  4. At the same time, they are now threaded diagonally to the opposite side in order to then go straight back to the other side.
  5. If you continue like this and have reached the penultimate pair of eyelets, the lower end can go diagonally through the last eyelet as usual. The top end is threaded straight up through the other last loop.
  6. Both ends are now above the eyelet strip. Done!

This is how you get “saw teeth” in your sneaker.

Method 3: "Cross" in the over-under variant

Example on the Puma R698 X Alife, Colorway: Peach Bud / Lyons Blue.

A casual deviation from the standard “cross-over” method. There is less friction here, which makes it easier to vary the tightness of the shoelaces and the laces do not wear out as quickly.

  1. Thread the lace from the inside out through the lowest pair of eyelets so that the ends of the same length hang out above the eyelet strip.
  2. Thread both ends crosswise into the opposite eyelet, from the outside to the inside.
  3. If end a is just above end b, the opposite happens at the second cross.
  4. With the method, not only do the upper laces alternate, but also whether the cross is above or below the eyelet bar. Every second cross stands out, so to speak.

The over and under version of the crossover is pretty simple but special nonetheless.

Method 4: the back loop

Example on BAIT X Bruce Lee X Onitsuka Tiger Men Colorado Eighty Five - Legend, Colorway: Yellow.

This type does not tie the shoes very tight, but it does make a difference and definitely stands out from the classic methods. Back loops are best for rope laces and give the shoe a rustic look. Important: You have to be particularly careful to lace evenly and tightly, as this method is not very stable and therefore quickly looks messy. In addition, you use more laces than usual, so depending on the shoe you may not get to the very last eyelet. Or you swap the laces for something longer.

  1. Thread the lace from the inside out through the lowest pair of eyelets so that the ends of the same length hang out above the eyelet strip.
  2. Both ends are now crossed but then go back in the original direction so that both ends are hooked into each other.
  3. Pull firmly and repeat this step (always thread through the eyelets from the inside out).
  4. At the end, simply tie as usual with a tight knot.

Step by step to the return loop.

Method 5: the grid / the diamond

Example on the Nike Air Max 1 Essential, Colorway: Birch / Dark Atomic / Teal / Sail / Poison Green.

For this elaborate method, your sneaker needs at least six pairs of eyelets. The diamond looks great on almost all types of laces. This extremely unusual variant has been very popular in the sneaker scene for years. The eye-catching effect is great, but it is difficult to adjust the strength. So it's best to put your shoe on first and then start lacing.

These instructions are intended for sneakers with six pairs of eyelets.

  1. Thread the lace from the inside out through the lowest pair of eyelets so that the ends of the same length hang out above the eyelet strip.
  2. Thread both ends into the fourth eyelet on the opposite side from the outside to the inside.
  3. Guide both ends below the eyelet bar through the next upper eyelet (i.e. the fifth).
  4. Return both ends through the second pair of eyelets. The laces cross each other. Each end should be once above and once below. A rhombus (the "diamond") is created in the middle.
  5. The third pair of holes is still free. This means that the ends are passed below the eyelet strip, each on its own side.
  6. From there the two ends are threaded through the sixth eyelet on the other side. While you are crossing the other strands, make sure that one end goes over-under-over and the other end goes under-over-under. There must now have been four diamonds and thus a large diamond.
  7. Arrived in the last eyelet, both ends are threaded through from the inside out and then well knotted (invisible).

This variant, also slightly modified, is also suitable for sneakers with seven and eight pairs of eyelets. The more eyelets, the bigger your diamond will be. You simplify the lacing process by first tying one end completely and then threading the other end through accordingly.

“The Diamond” turns the simplest sneakers into real eye-catchers.

Method 6: the zipper

Example on BAIT X Bruce Lee X Onitsuka Tiger Men Colorado Eighty Five - Legend, Colorway: Yellow.

If you use this method, there will be many small diamonds in the middle. When lacing you should pay attention to evenness, otherwise the whole thing will quickly look messed up and totally knotted. The "zipper" comes across best with flat laces. The "zipper" holds well and looks very casual. However, it is difficult to make the laces tighter or looser afterwards.

  1. Thread the lace from the inside out through the lowest pair of eyelets so that the ends of the same length hang out above the eyelet strip.
  2. Pass both ends below the "bar" and cross them through the diagonally opposite eyelet (also from the inside to the outside).
  3. Twist each end around the drawn cord once so that a closed loop is created through the eyelet.
  4. Cross the ends diagonally again, thread into the respective eyelets using the same method.
  5. Small diamonds should form in the middle.
  6. Pull the whole thing through to the end and then knot.

The "zipper" closes step by step.

Method 7: the double cross

Example on the Etnies Fader LS Women in white.

At first glance, the double cross looks a bit arbitrary. But if it is properly laced, you can definitely discover a system behind it, which looks super casual on a second look.

This procedure is intended for sneakers with seven pairs of eyelets. End a is always crossed over end b.

  1. Thread the lace from the outside to the inside through the lowest pair of eyelets so that the ends of the same length hang out below the eyelet strip.
  2. Thread the ends crosswise into the third eyelet, from the inside out.
  3. Now thread the laces crosswise into the second free eyelets, this time from the outside to the inside.
  4. The laces are now threaded crosswise again into the fifth pair of eyelets.
  5. The laces are threaded crosswise into the exposed fourth eyelets (inside out).
  6. Cross it continues into the seventh and last loop.
  7. Now the ends are knotted, the sixth pair of eyelets remains empty.

The double cross looks more complicated than it is.

To be continued ...

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